Graduate Course Descriptions

IAFF 6102 Global Gender Policy

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the development of global policy aimed at achieving gender equality. The course provides an overview of the concept of gender equality, its capture in global policy and approaches to advancing implementation of select thematic areas of gender equality policy at global and country levels. Participants will gain knowledge of the genealogy of the current architecture of global gender equality policy, learn to critique policy approaches taken to advance gender equality and become familiar with the various strategies and tools used to advance implementation of these policies. Discussion of thematic policy areas includes formal economy employment, international security policy, education, health, violence against women, and responses to humanitarian crises.

Registration restricted to students in the MA in International Affairs, International Development Studies, Global Gender Policy Certificate programs, and MIPP students. All other students who would like to register, please email [email protected].

 

IAFF 6108 International Development Policy

This course examines the scope and nature of international development assistance and the challenges currently facing development agencies.  It surveys development theory since Bretton Woods and the Marshall Plan and considers how changes have been reflected in the operational strategies of leading bilateral and multilateral donors.  Then the focus of the course will shift to the methods and tools that characterize the work of principal donors, from needs assessment and project design to evaluation.  The effectiveness of development assistance will be an important theme of this course, in particular how mixed results have brought methods and concepts into question and how agencies are responding to this challenge.

 

IAFF 6118 The Ethics of Foreign Aid

This class will explore the ethical issues surrounding foreign aid. We will address questions such as: Are wealthier countries morally obligated to give aid to poorer countries, and if so, how much? Sometimes aid comes in the form of "development assistance" with political conditions attached. Are wealthy countries and international financial institutions ever morally justified in attaching these conditions? If so, when, and what kinds of conditions is it morally permissible for them to attach? How should we evaluate the morality of aid programs that provide valuable goods and services, but also become complicit in wrongdoing within the communities they aim to help and/or make those communities dependent on foreign aid?

 

IAFF 6118 Applied Qualitative Methods

The objective for this course is for students to become consumers and producers of scholarly research and knowledge. Students will become familiarized with various qualitative methodologies, focusing on methods in international relations. Students develop skills in determining how suitable, applicable, or useful various methods are likely to be in different circumstances and settings, given the research question. Students will engage with scholarly research in the field via reading, commenting on, and critiquing the work of others, including journal article and the work of classmates. 

The activities and assignments in the course build toward a draft research design. This project and other activities are designed to give students as close to real-world and hands-on experience in research, in the online classroom. As such, the class will utilize experiential learning activities and will make extensive use of discussion boards and out-of-class material. 

 

IAFF 6118 Data Analytics for International Affairs

This course provides a foundational overview of data analytics in the social sciences. Students will be introduced to concepts in data, statistics, and research methodology. The course will then explore how to use and interpret descriptive statistics; how to measure, categorize, and evaluate variables; where to find data for analysis; and how to critically evaluate analytical research. In the second half of the course, students will examine the rules underlying statistical models, statistical significance, and causal inference, and interpret a variety of models used in quantitative research. This course is quantitative in nature, but does not require advanced mathematical knowledge.

 

IAFF 6118 Gender, War, and Peace

With a specific focus on women’s rights, roles, and experiences of war and peacebuilding, this course thematically examines war as a gendered phenomenon, using feminist analysis as a theoretical frame. The seminar thematically covers issues such as: masculinities, femininities, and militarization; violent actors and the politics of gendered victim/perpetrator roles; wartime gendered violence; the post-war context and critical examination of global laws, policies, and normative approaches to international peace and security. The seminar focuses on a number of case study contexts globally and will draw on feminist and gender theory while also examining policy and practice approaches to addressing the gendered aspects of war and peace.

 

IAFF 6118 International Law

This course will cover the fundamental underpinnings of international law, with a focus on Public International Law, and address specialized topics ranging from environmental law to the law of war. At the end of the course, students should be conversant with the international legal order and have a strong understanding of the law’s applicability to international issues.

 

IAFF 6118 Nuclear Security Policy

This graduate seminar familiarizes students with the topics, institutions, and tools necessary to understand, inform, develop, and implement nuclear security policy, encompassing the security of weapons-usable nuclear materials and the prevention of nuclear terrorism and proliferation by denying access to these materials.  Special emphasis will be given to contemporary trends including state failure, the role of non-state actors, diffusion of dual-use technology, and the development of disruptive technology. Students will be evaluated on the basis of the development of five types of communication products relevant to nuclear security policy debates:  1) an action memorandum to a senior U.S. Government official, 2) an op-ed piece suitable for a mass distribution publication, 3) a white paper proposing work to a potential client or funder, 4) a non-paper communicating a policy position to a foreign government, and 5) an action alert suitable for distribution to an activist network.

 

IAFF 6118 Global Energy Markets

This course will cover global energy markets and how they influence international affairs and related energy and environmental policy development, infrastructure investments and global energy security. Each of the physical and financial markets of petroleum, natural gas, liquefied natural gas, coal, nuclear power, renewables and electricity will be covered. Emphasis will be on European, Russian, Middle East, Asian, South American and North American markets. Students will learn about the supply chains of each energy resource and how each commodity is priced. The course will then cover global trading hubs for energy derivatives (futures, swaps and options) used to hedge energy price volatility in specific regions and markets. The role of energy derivatives in price formation of oil, natural gas, coal and electricity and how they affect infrastructure investment and international affairs. The course is aimed at students interested in an overall understanding of global energy markets and students pursuing regional studies. Students can pursue regional interests through projects. Contemporary examples will be used extensively in this class.

 

IAFF 6118 Theories of Ethnic Politics

Experts often regard ethnic divides as causing everything from separatist violence to democratic breakdown. This course engages the most prominent recent and classic research in the politics of ethnicity, nationalism, and identity, research that frequently challenges common assumptions. Readings will include leading works in a wide variety of theoretical and empirical traditions, including comparative political science, rational choice, comparative history, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Empirical material will address cases from many parts of the world.

 

IAFF 6122 Development Policy & Practice

International development is a dynamic field of theory, policy and practice. Understanding all three and their intersections is crucial to working effectively in the field of development. The politics and practice of international development have changed dramatically over the past 60 years. Development practitioners must be prepared to adapt to a climate that shifts constantly in response to changes in organizational structure, policy mandates and practice patterns. This course will be conducted as a graduate-level seminar, in which assigned readings will be discussed in class. Careful reading of required texts, reports and other documents is a key component of this course, as is preparation of materials relevant to class assignments. Students will be expected to contribute robustly to class discussions, articulating informed opinions and understanding of authors’ arguments.

 

IAFF 6138 Violence, Gender, and Humanitarian Assistance

The objective of the course is to engage students in developing a practical understanding of the issues, challenges, policies, and interventions around one of the most challenging health, human rights, and protection issues in humanitarian emergencies. Gender-based violence (GBV) is a multi-sectoral, multi-level, and inter- organizational problem. To further complicate the issue, GBV is on the blurry line between “humanitarian aid” and “development”. Each class will involve active student participation, with the instructor and/or guest speaker giving a brief presentation (including case studies and short films) and students summarizing the key issues and discussion points from assigned readings, followed by discussion and analysis.

 

IAFF 6138 Climate Change & Sustainable Development

With climate change impacts being felt across many parts of the world – particularly in fragile states and those least able to adapt – climate change has become a central part of the global sustainable development agenda.  The concept of climate resilient development is bringing core climate science into development strategies and programs, and posing significant questions about how development investments are made and how results are measured.  It also raises key ethical questions about the expectations placed on developing countries to mitigate their greenhouse gas emissions as well as the role of developed countries to support developing countries to adapt to climate change. This course will investigate the science of climate change, the impacts for developing countries, and the theoretical foundations of policy responses.  It will also delve into the practical opportunities and challenges related to addressing climate change in developing countries and integrating climate change considerations into existing development approaches.

 

IAFF 6138 Democracy & Governance Development

This graduate seminar focuses on democracy and governance within the field of comparative politics, looking at these specific topics as they are applied to development. Rather than taking a specific, geographic focus, this course is organized to investigate substantive topics across the democracy and governance spectrum. A number of country-specific examples and cases will be explored to test the application of theories and to deepen students’ appreciation of the extent and limits of democracy and governance development.

 

IAFF 6138 Development, Indigenous Peoples, and Minorities

Indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities are usually more marginalized politically, suffer more from poverty, and experience more social injustice than others in the states in which they live. For this reason, they have traditionally been on the margins of international development projects, which often negotiate their priorities with the states in which they are implemented. In the case of indigenous peoples, development has also often threatened their cultural traditions, displaced them from their homelands, and destroyed their traditional livelihoods.  However, over the last several decades the field of international development has paid more attention to these marginalized groups, and many development agencies have adopted particular policies for working with them.  This course will examine the ways that different indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities have experienced development and the ways that development agencies have begun to take their particular interests and needs into account. It will do so by examining how to recognize indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities and understand their particular interests and needs, by providing information about specific international development agencies’ policies for working with these groups, and through the study of several case studies of indigenous peoples encountering development in the Americas, Asia, and Africa.  Students will leave the course with a better understanding of how to design and implement development projects with indigenous peoples and minorities.

 

IAFF 6138 Strategic Environmental Management

While many in the business, government, and non-profit sectors view environmental protection as a threat to competitiveness, others see win-win opportunities. This course provides students with graduate level knowledge and real life case examples that will allow them to design profitable corporate environmental management strategies. After taking this course, students will be able to:1. Formulate profitable corporate environmental management strategies. 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of green differentiation advantage strategies.3. Explain how corporate environmental strategies are affected by: stakeholder pressures, distinctive country contexts, and variations in business-level characteristics. And 4. Explain the opportunities/challenges of climate change trends for businesses.

 

IAFF 6138 Gender, Development, and Disasters

This course will focus on gender and socioeconomic development as they link to disasters. Disasters have multiple types of effects on households, communities, and nations. Yet, disasters do not affect everyone equally or simultaneously. Research shows that, regardless of the disaster, people vary in how they are impacted and for what length of time; variations in what are called disaster vulnerability and resilience link to social and economic differences by gender, age, income level, disability status, and related characteristics. Development that seeks to address inequality and support sustainability is concerned with gender and the problems of disasters’ differential impacts. With this course, students become familiar with contemporary analyses of the relationships among gender, disaster, and development from a range of sources and disciplines. Students will provide their own analyses of information about gender issues within disaster reconstruction and related economic development.

 

IAFF 6138 Private Sector Development

The process necessary for countries to experience per capita GDP growth and create fiscal resources necessary for broader development begins at the firm level.  Yet, in some countries, it is difficult for firms to grow, or at least grow to levels that support improved health, education and welfare desired by most citizens. This course will examine the ecosystems for economic growth at the firm level. Lectures, readings and class activities will acclimate students to the complexities of growth, while identifying and critiquing common approaches by donor agencies to enterprise development.  Students will apply their knowledge by constructing a hypothetical country strategy that would be used in the design of projects, programs and activities over a defined period.  The student will be introduced to the elements of project design and evaluation, as well other commonly used financial tools to support enterprise development.

 

IAFF 6138 Gender and Development

This graduate-level seminar will begin by examining the evolution of theoretical approaches regarding gender and development and the debates that have emerged over how to promote gender equity and rights across the gender spectrum. We will then consider some of the key issues in the field of gender and development and the challenges and successes that development practitioners have experienced in addressing gender inequalities. Throughout the course, we will seek to identify general patterns and lessons with broader applications as well as to recognize differences within and between societies. We will use a combination of academic sources, international development reports, and other materials produced by development practitioners to ground our discussions and study how organizations have sought to implement gender-sensitive approaches to development. The assignments are practical and relevant to professional work in the field of gender and development.

 

IAFF 6138 International Development Management and Tools

International Development Management: Processes and Tools is designed to socialize students into international development management. It gives students the opportunities to learn and apply skills and tools specifically developed for international development. It will challenge the origins and definitions of international development. The course investigates key theories, perspectives and approaches, and provides students with training in specific international development management tools and processes through team projects with international development organizations.

 

IAFF 6138 Localizing Humanitarian Action

In 2016, the United Nation’s Grand Bargain articulated a vision that humanitarian action should be “as local as possible, as international as necessary.” Localization refers to putting local actors and crisis- and conflict-affected populations at the center of humanitarian action. Localization is a cross-cutting issue that affects humanitarian policy, coordination and financing, and practices such as accountability, capacity-building and participation in humanitarian action. Despite a stated commitment to the goal of localization, institutional, political, and practical factors hinder its full policy implementation. In this course, we will examine the multi-dimensional nature of localization, analyze factors that impede its full realization, unpack assumptions and biases about local actors and localized response, and explore the effectiveness of localization in cases where localized aid delivery has been piloted. Our approach will be to examine humanitarian action from the bottom-up, by considering the roles, responsibilities, and effectiveness of local actors, such as refugee-led organizations, and regional actors such as Africa CDC and area-based humanitarian coordination hubs. Students will work on a research project that analyzes and assesses how localization has been implemented in COVID-19 responses.

 

IAFF 6139 IDS Capstone

 

IAFF 6146 Space Law

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of legal principles and issues in domestic and international space law. Students will read and critically evaluate the U.N. treaties that establish legal principles of international space law and show how legal institutions are organized and interact both nationally and internationally; demonstrate an understanding of the multifaceted nature of legal and policy issues and demonstrate how to approach problems in an interdisciplinary manner; and acquire the background knowledge and analytical tools that will allow them to address problems, recommend policy and legal options as well as specific legal solutions, and evaluate the possible outcomes in different settings.

 

IAFF 6151 Environmental Policy

This seminar course examines environmental policy and politics from an international perspective.  The course will introduce students to the fundamentals of international environmental policymaking processes, such as key policy paradigms, actors, and institutions; familiarize students with critical issue areas including climate change, ozone depletion, international resource conservation, and others; and examine environmental policymaking as it relates to other issue areas such as science and technology and international development. The goal is to prepare students to think critically and analyze environmental policy and politics in the context of the global political system. Students should come away from the course with a clearer understanding of what environmental policy entails, in terms of both practice and of outcomes; what the range of relevant policy options and key issue areas are; and a generally broader knowledge of international environmental issues and the factors, drivers, and constraints that affect them.

 

IAFF 6153 Science, Technology & National Security Policy

A broad, complex, and multidimensional set of factors contribute to the ability of states to use science and technology to advance their national security. This course examines how effectively states, and the United States in particular, develop policies designed to translate science and technology into strategic advantage. To assess these factors the course addresses a range of issues including innovation, revolutions in military affairs, globalization and international economic integration, technology transfer and export controls, changing global security dynamics, and the impact of emerging technologies on defense industries and military power. Major themes addressed throughout the course would form parts of any integrative framework for understanding the interplay between science, technology, and national security policy.

 

IAFF 6158 Economics of Space

This course will address international space policy issues facing the United States and place them in context with broader technological advances and the changing strategic environment. The course will address current bureaucratic and regulatory issues facing U.S. space programs with regard to dual-use technologies, including export controls, spectrum management, and licensing of commercial remote sensing systems. Conflicts over dual-use technologies, such as space launch, remote sensing, satellite navigation, and communications, will be examined for their implications for a range of national interests. The course will also address strategic choices facing other nations in space activities, including dependence on U.S., European, and Russian space capabilities, developing indigenous space programs, and use of commercial space capabilities.

 

IAFF 6158 Issues in US Space Policy: Tools and Scenarios

This course will address international space policy issues facing the United States and provides an overview of common tools (e.g., orbital mechanics, cost estimation, regulation) used in space policy making and implementation.  The course will address current policy and regulatory issues facing U.S. space programs with regard to dual-use technologies, including export controls, spectrum management, and licensing of commercial remote sensing systems. Conflicts over dual-use technologies, such as space launch, remote sensing, satellite navigation, and communications, will be examined for their implications for a range of national interests. The course will also address strategic choices facing other nations in space activities, including dependence on U.S., European, and Russian space capabilities, developing indigenous space programs, and use of commercial space capabilities.

 

IAFF 6160 Defense Policy & Program Analysis I

Since the National Security Act of 1947 established the Department of Defense, the development of defense policy has evolved into a complex process. This course will explore the various dimensions of defense policy to include political factors, major actors, the processes by which defense policy is made, the challenges of managing the defense establishment, and debates about the future roles and missions for the military. The approach to this course will be combination of lecture and discussion with emphasis on the latter. The course will cover some theoretical concepts about defense policy and analysis but wherever possible we will discuss defense policy in practical terms based on recent developments. We will begin our exploration by examining the challenge of developing strategy, the nature of civil-military relations, and then proceed to a discussion of various actors and their roles in the defense policy process. We will also discuss budgetary and weapons acquisition issues as well as the evolution of warfare.

 

IAFF 6162 Security Policy Analysis

This core course for students in the Elliott School’s M.A. program in Security Policy Studies is designed to help students analyze, assess, and make judgments about security policies. Policies are statements of intent or commitments to act made by governments and other actors; they involve decisions about the priorities and values to pursue and the resources and tools that will be devoted to that enterprise. Every policy decision could have been made differently. The course examines how social scientific concepts, methods and research techniques are used to identify security threats, risks and challenges, and develop effective responses to them. Students will analyze how security policies are formulated; how policy options are developed and how to choose between them; how to identify and evaluate the effectiveness of different policy tools; and how data and research influences security policy, or not.

 

IAFF 6163 Transnational Security

This course focuses on transnational security issues and considers how many of these myriad challenges constitute threats to global peace and security. The combined effects of such transnational security issues as drug, weapons, and human trafficking, piracy, acts of terrorism, infectious diseases, and deliberate environmental destruction, along with such critical enablers as corruption, and money movements, are not strangers on the world stage. What is new is their global reach and destructive potential. As a result, these issues have made policy makers consider different conceptions of security and, at times, to move beyond sole considerations of state sovereignty into the realm of human security.

 

IAFF 6165 Fundamentals of Intelligence

This graduate-level seminar will discuss the basics of intelligence collection, production, and analysis and provide an introduction to the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), the authorities under which the IC operates, its role in informing U.S. national security and foreign policy, its role in implementing policy decisions, and the formation of policy and laws that guide the IC. The class will examine the IC in the context of historical, current, and expected future scenarios, and will discuss historic and potential future changes in how the IC informs and implements policy, as well as how oversight is conducted. In particular, the class will discuss the expanded role of the IC, both analytically and operationally, in the post-9/11 world, as well as the impact of the Wikileaks, Snowden, and other unauthorized disclosures in recent years.

 

IAFF 6169 Homeland Security

The mission of the course is to develop a better understanding of the present and future direction of the local and international aspects of securing a nation from current and developing threats. The course develops an understanding of operational, diplomatic, and technical policy making that includes the workings of international organizations and groups such as the United Nations, the European Union, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization as well as such efforts as the Proliferation Security Initiative and other arms control and weapons control agreements, treaties and organizations. At the national level the course will address securing national borders, countering illicit trafficking in weapons, precursors and people who may constitute a threat, and developing technologies to protect citizens and using intelligence and law enforcement.

 

IAFF 6186 Future Crimes

This course seeks to understand the interplay of Internet technology and criminal activity. While offline violent crime is usually linked to cities, and more specifically, to definite spaces in cities, future crimes in our online space reach all of us everywhere, even if we don’t do anything, simply because we are connected (and interconnected) online. Technology is a double-edged sword: as much good as it brings, it can also create unprecedented possibilities for crimes — many of which may be new and un-thought. Given the freshness of this phenomenon, this course will seek to identify the relevant questions rather than give definitive answers. As such, it will profit from the fact that many of the ‘students’ may actually be the most knowledgeable in terms of niche aspects of the Internet, its access, and its social media applications. This means that students will have ample opportunity to use their ‘wired’ minds to be creative and innovative — perhaps sharing aspects of their online experiences to enrich the class and enlighten their fellow class members.

Some of the questions that the course will explore and refine include: Are our current understanding and existing theories of crime and crime prevention approaches, appropriate to deal with the new wave of future crimes linked to technology? Will technology increase crime exponentially, mirroring the famous ‘Moore’s Law’ of advances in computing capability? What type of crimes are we, and might we, end up dealing with as a society? Are our current legal and justice systems in the United States capable of dealing with these new crimes? Has the Internet revolution already created the path for irreversible crimes?

Most of the topics that we discuss will be approached in an interdisciplinary manner, to stimulate students’ broader interests, as well as their analytical skills.  The course seeks students’ continuous active participation and creativity. This is essential in this course, given the topic and its topicality. Discussions, projects and oral presentations will form a core part of the course.

 

IAFF 6186 International Peacekeeping

This course analyzes contemporary international peace operations, including those conducted by the United Nations and regional organizations such as the African Union and European Union. It examines the crucial political and organizational dynamics as well as some of the major contemporary debates about peace operations, enabling students to critically assess their strengths and limitations. Part 1 explores several fundamental questions about peace operations: What are they? What are they for? Who conducts them? How should we evaluate them? Part 2 then addresses the main policy debates shaping contemporary peace operations around the world. Topics covered include force generation, the role of regional security organizations and private security companies, gender issues, policing, use of force, civilian protection, organized crime and partnership peacekeeping. The course will also encourage students to develop a realistic empathy for the constraints that confront decisionmakers in complex environments characterized by uncertainty and limited resources.

 

IAFF 6171 Intro to Conflict Resolution

This course provides students with an introduction to the field of conflict analysis and resolution. It is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry and application. The course will introduce students to the major concepts and issues currently animating the field, explore the main strategies for responding to conflicts, and help them recognize and critique the assumptions upon which these strategies rest. This course considers the “upper end” of the conflict spectrum, focusing on inter-state disputes, contemporary civil wars, complex political emergencies and other forms of organized violence. At the end of the course students should be acquainted with the nature of conflict resolution as a distinct theoretical and applied field of study and have some understanding of current thinking about major approaches to war prevention, mitigation, settlement, and post-war reconstruction projects. It will be useful for anyone with an interest in conflict resolution and management, including professionals in the fields of diplomacy, journalism, development assistance, humanitarian aid or international peacekeeping who wish to develop their knowledge of this important area.

 

IAFF 6173 Security and Development

This course aims to consider the relationship between security and development across a number of issue areas. Its objective is to enable you to create your own ‘map’ of the relationship and help you to understand some of the connections and disconnections between the two fields.  The course will also allow you to deepen your understanding of one developing country and to demonstrate that knowledge through a range of products. The existence of this course reflects the fact that there is growing interest from the security field in issues that have traditionally been the purview of development. This seminar course looks at armed conflict and failed states, but it seeks to look beyond these issues as well to areas such as demography, the environment, urbanization, and trade, to see how the development-security relationship looks in these issue areas.

 

IAFF 6186 US National Security

This course examines the problems and issues confronting American national security policymakers using a combination of empirical information and conceptual analysis. The course content includes conceptual definitions of national security, policymaking processes and debates, national security institutions and organizations, relationships between foreign, economic and defense policy, and civil-military relations. The course presumes familiarity with American politics and U.S. history and encourages students to keep up on relevant world events by reading legitimate news sources. At the end of the semester, students should be able to critically engage, understand, articulate and explain ideas and arguments about the U.S. national security process and the complexity of American strategic interests and decision-making processes.

 

IAFF 6186 Russia and International Security

Russia’s “hybrid warfare” has become one of the most effective military strategies in recent history. Russia’s blend of offensive cyber intrusions, information warfare, covert actions, special operations forces, and traditional Soviet-era combat tactics has the world on its heels. This seminar will teach students how Russia’s security apparatus executes disinformation campaigns, political sabotage, election disruption, government subterfuge, artificial intelligence “bots” in social media, computational propaganda, and new technologies to dominate conventional battlefields. Other topics include: Pre-Soviet and Soviet military history; Russian foreign policy and grand strategy; NATO enlargement; Russian military interventions in Chechnya, Georgia, and Syria; the Ukraine/Crimean crisis and aftermath, energy security; cyber warfare and espionage; status of new Russian defense systems and military capabilities; post-Soviet States’ security and Eurasian conflicts; threats from Eurasian transnational crime; nuclear strategy, arms control, and missile defense; and whether Russia and China are allies or rivals.

 

IAFF 6186 Political Risk Analysis

The political risk analysis (PRA) graduate course will examine frameworks and methodologies that measure and mitigate political risk in a range of environments at the macro (national and international) and at the micro (local and regional) levels. Approaches will combine research from the international relations and political risk areas together with risk analysis derived from psychology to provide students with an array of approaches to understand the critical aspects of evaluating risks. Emphasis is placed on the interchangeable connection between theory, research and practice, as well as the integration of various approaches towards political risk analysis in an organized framework. Political risk analysis is a multidisciplinary field of study which analyzes, measures, manages and mitigates the impact of political risk to foreign and domestic businesses and investments, organizations, and individuals. Political risk emanates from the (in) actions or reactions of stakeholders within a political system to events.

 

IAFF 6186 Illicit Finance & Security

Transnational illicit non-state actors, corrupt state officials, and governments conducting illicit activity all exploit the international financial system to move and hide funds, raise revenue, or procure and pay for goods. The illicit dimension of the globalization of finance has sparked states and international organizations to develop systemic regulatory frameworks and expand and refine the use of targeted sanctions. This course will examine the operations, mechanisms, and vulnerabilities of illicit financial networks and U.S. and multilateral efforts to counter them, highlighting the key role of the private sector in contributing to the success or failure of financial measures. The course will also examine the use of finance as a foreign policy tool in support of security interests such as resolving conflict or influencing decision making.

 

IAFF 6186 Strategic Planning for the 21st Century

This course aims to consider the importance of US government strategic national security planning, including having a grand national strategy and strategic planning that flows from it, and to provide background and analytical skills on process and content. We will consider strategic planning from a conceptual and practical   point of view. The course will offer a variety of possible alternatives for grand national strategy in the early 21st century, providing different lenses through which to view strategic planning and the choices that ensue. Historical and current situations will add to the richness of reading and discussion about strategic planning. We will also compare government strategic planning with practices in the wider business environment.

 

IAFF 6186 Countering Violent Extremism

This course focuses on government and non-government efforts to prevent and counter violent extremism. It provides students with an introduction to the nascent academic literature to chart the evolution of CVE over the past decade or so. It also offers an opportunity to critically examine and discuss domestic and international policies and programs that aim to prevent and counter violent extremism. The course will be useful for anyone with an interest in counterterrorism, preventing violent conflict as well as a wide array of disciplines and issues including diplomacy, development assistance, criminology, psychology, sociology and political science. The course will connect theory to practice through discussion, research and case study reviews of real events.

 

IAFF 6186 Stabilization & Peacebuilding

The classic interstate conflicts of the past have been largely replaced by intra-state and regional conflicts involving both state and non-state actors. States and regions beset by political and economic instability provide fertile ground for nationalist, sectarian and ethnic conflict, and terrorism and organized criminal activities. In addition, the inability of many of these fragile and weak states to confront natural and man-made disasters, the effects of climate change, pandemic disease and worldwide economic shocks adds further stresses that can exacerbate conflict. This course will examine the lessons from these missions covering general principles and approaches that can be applied for stabilization and peacebuilding, required resources, the structures that have been organized to mount such operations, the gaps that remain, and the knowledge and skills the new peacebuilder needs to operate in these environments.

 

IAFF 6186 Nuclear Strategy

A quarter century after nuclear weapons receded into the background of international politics, debates about nuclear strategy have returned. This course provides an advanced survey of nuclear deterrence theory and historical practice, beginning with basics of nuclear weapons design, strategy, historical case studies of Cold War policy, and nuclear ethics. The latter half of the class examines current nuclear force structure and posture, as well as contemporary debates about U.S. nuclear force structure requirements and modernization, counterforce planning, arms control, and the deterrence relationships with Russia, China, and North Korea. Because the course covers academic theory, primary policy documents, and historical descriptions of case studies, the requirements for reading and class participation are high.

 

IAFF 6186 Military Power & Effectiveness

This course explores what makes the militaries of some states highly proficient fighting machines, whereas others seemingly cannot execute the simplest tasks. Although the effectiveness of navies and air forces could also be examined, the focus of this class (following the bulk of the literature) is on ground forces. We begin by looking at the various ways military effectiveness has been defined in the existing literature, and the different levels of analysis that are used to examine effectiveness. The goal in this section of the course is to understand and criticize how scholars of military effectiveness measure the concept. Section II of the course assesses the theoretical literature, starting with realist theories of preponderance and technology, but proceeding quickly to non-material factors such as strategy/force employment, regime type, civil-military relations, military culture, unit and societal cohesion, and identity. The goals of this section of the course are to classify how various works define military effectiveness, specify what levels of analysis they address, and evaluate how well they explain effectiveness in general and in specific cases. In the third section of the course, we examine three case studies in depth: World War I; the German victory in the Battle of France in May/June 1940; and Iraq’s military performance in the Iran-Iraq War and the two Persian Gulf Wars (1991 and 2003). The goals of Section III are first to understand several important historical cases, but more importantly to apply the theories from Section II to explain variation in the effectiveness of the belligerents. Finally, section IV briefly considers effectiveness in unconventional conflicts. The goals of this section are to understand the differences between conventional and unconventional war, the strategies that states and non-state actors have in unconventional wars and their relative effectiveness, and factors that affect the will and cohesion of belligerents in these war

 

IAFF 6186 Cybersecurity

This course examines current issues in the realm of cybersecurity, focusing on cybersecurity strategy, threats, conflict, and policy. It begins with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and considers the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through case studies, it examines previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. Students will analyze the roles of several different types of actors in cyber security including states, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups, and private sector responses. This course will also analyze cyber deterrence and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. Technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

 

IAFF 6186 Insurgency & Counterinsurgency

This course provides students with an introduction to the nature of insurgency, some key historical examples of how insurgencies were defeated, and analytical frameworks and tools for understanding and countering insurgencies. It is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry into related topics such as irregular warfare, security and development, stabilization and peacebuilding, responses to terrorism, and conflict resolution. The course examines the multi-disciplinary nature of insurgencies, and introduces students to the major concepts and issues of the topic, explores the main types of insurgencies, and analyzes in depth a number of strategic cases of counterinsurgency to help students understand the complexity and the variety of this form of warfare in the modern world. The course provides key frameworks for analysis for the study of insurgency and explores possible solutions to a number of current conflicts. 

 

IAFF 6186 Weapons of Mass Destruction and Arms Control in the 21st Century

For the past decades, states around the globe have been parties to several international treaties that seek to limit the possession and proliferation of chemical, biological and nuclear weapons. These agreements have been generally successful in keeping the number of states acquiring these weapons to a minimum. Most states have not developed such weapons and do not have a desire to do so. However, there have been other challenges to these regimes. They include everything from allegations of noncompliance, new technologies not envisioned when these treaties entered into force, to unilateral actions of withdrawal. These new challenges have created an increased uncertainty in the arms control community about the current and future status of arms control. This course will explore these issues and provide an opportunity for students to engage in a simulation that centers on what the future holds for these important international security issues.

 

IAFF 6186 U.S. Grand Strategy

What should the United States do in the world? How has it, and how should it? This course examines U.S. grand strategy, meaning the economic, diplomatic and politico-military means that the state can employ to pursue its interests. The course first assesses the components of grand strategy: what are US interests, the means to achieve them, and the challenges to doing so. It then analyzes recent US grand strategies—the Cold War and 4 subsequent US administrations (Clinton, Bush, Obama and Trump). Finally, the course evaluates four principal options as the basis for grand strategic debates today. Whatever your passion or specialty in global affairs, this course gives both the framework within which it will be pursued, and the trade-offs that will have to be considered. It's the big picture.

 

IAFF 6186 Emerging Threats

This course surveys emerging risks and challenges that threaten human, national and global security. It does so by paying special attention to a range of military and non-military issues where science and technology play a major role. Topics covered include how to think about the concepts of risk and securitization; revolutions in military affairs and hybrid warfare; the challenges of nuclear security and terrorism; conflict in cyberspace; the uses and consequences of robotics, drones and autonomous weapons systems; military developments in biotechnology; artificial intelligence; as well as non-military issues related to demography, urbanization, public health, the environment, and outer space. For each issue, the course examines the politics of scientific and technological evolution by identifying the key drivers of change; the nature of threats at the local, national, and global levels; and how existing security policies should be reformed in response. A technical background is not required but will enhance one’s understanding.

 

IAFF 6186 Maritime Security & Threats

Globalization and technology have made supply chains longer and more complex. This course examines the economic significance of maritime resources and the global supply chain as it pertains to maritime security and threats, including piracy, smuggling, natural resources, maritime critical infrastructure, disasters, and terror/cyber-attacks. Students will analyze how economic prosperity depends on the safe and efficient transportation of raw material and goods, and the impact of supply disruptions caused by natural or man-made events. The course is designed to introduce students to international law, national security strategies, and policies used to claim/compete for natural resources in highly disputed waters and control important sea lines of communication.

 

IAFF 6198 Economics of US - China Trade

The U.S. and China are the world’s two largest economies and have had a complex economic relationship based on mutual dependence and competition. This course will provide students with an understanding of core issues underlying this consequential and dynamic relationship, focusing on developments within the Chinese economy that have affected bilateral trade, investment, and competitiveness conditions. Emphasis will be placed on developments that unfolded in the past four decades, starting with the 1978 economic reforms in China and concluding with contemporary trade war conditions that have been challenged by decoupling initiatives and the COVID-19 epidemic. This course will encourage students to craft original positions by applying their course learnings, knowledge of international trade, and research and writing skills to contemporary U.S.-China trade issues. It will also provide students the opportunity to critically evaluate the literature and policy positions, draft original policy briefings, and debate issues that are likely to impact future U.S.-China trade conditions. 

 

IAFF 6198 Financial Accounting

The role of accounting in decisions of management and external parties. Analysis and interpretation of financial statements. Understanding, interpretation, and implementation of financial accounting and systems of control. Evaluation of the effects of alternative financial reporting decisions on reported financial position. Reporting differences across geographies. International Tax considerations.

 

IAFF 6208 Communication in Modern Diplomacy

This course examines the expanding public dimension of modern diplomacy.  We will explore how diplomats and political leaders communicate in a world of rapid globalization, new diplomatic actors, complex policy issues, digital technologies, increased risk, and uncertain boundaries between foreign and domestic.  This seminar is designed to serve the interdisciplinary interests of students in global communication, international relations, and media studies.

 

IAFF 6222 International Security Politics

This course is an introduction to the dynamic and deeply important field of international security.  The purpose is to provide students with an overview of the theoretical and policy debates in the field of international security. During the course we will examine a variety of contemporary security issues to gain an understanding of these threats and their impact on international security in the 21st century.  This course begins with an overview of key concepts, theories, and approaches in the field of international security.  It then examines inter-state, intra-state, and transnational security problems, with the understanding that many security problems cut across these categories.  Analysis of important security topics (causes of war, great-power relations, weapons of mass destruction, arms racing and arms control, crisis management, civil wars, insurgency, terrorism, and cyber security, among others) is combined with a review of regional developments.  The final section of the course examines non-military issues (poverty, health, population movements, organized crime, and globalization for example) that have major security implications, as well as the role of international organizations in international security.  The course concludes with a look to the future.

 

IAFF 6222 Civil - Military Relations

The study of civil-military relations examines the relationship and interaction of the government, military and the citizenry – all of whom are crucial players in the shaping of national security policy. However, each of these institutions has its own priorities, values and purposes, yet they all must find ways to cooperate in order to protect the country’s interests, both domestically and abroad.  Moreover, each carries its own unique source of power which demands a careful balancing at the risk of subverting one of the others.  This course will examine a broad range of topics regarding civil military relations to include civil-military theory, practice (both in western and non-western societies) and various socio-political issues that influence civil-military relations in the 21stcentury (mass media, contractors and the “civ-mil gap”).  The course will also explore recent case studies (Iraq and Afghanistan) to analyze how all the major players in the civil-military relations dynamic have functioned in two major applications of military force.  Overall, this course will help inform the statesman, professional military officer and citizen in creating a better understanding of his/her role in relation to their government and society in the policy making process.

 

IAFF 6222 Globalization After COVID-19

Globalization, underpinned by free trade, lies at the intersection of domestic and foreign policy.  Since World War II, the United States and the West have constructed a neoliberal order, fueled by capitalism and democracy, which has led to unprecedented economic growth and political freedoms around the world.  These gains and this order, however, have come at a significant cost and now being re-examined and challenged by many in the developing and developed world, particularly in light of COVID-19.  

This hands-on seminar examines the tensions between global and local values, between liberalizing markets and national economies, and between global governance and national politics.  Specifically, the course introduces students to globalization’s key aspects including trade, investment, inequity, governance, environment, culture, and criminal networks.  Students apply their learning by examining how COVID-19 has affected the developing world and advising U.S. President Biden or China President Xi on the future of globalization in a post-pandemic world and what policies should be implemented.

 

IAFF 6302 Taiwan: International Development and Foreign Policy

China’s rise, U.S. engagement in Asia, and democratic change in Taiwan have made Taiwan a focal point of contemporary U.S. and international policy consideration. More than a decade of repeated crises in cross strait relations was followed by dramatic improvement 2008-2016, which stalled in the face of domestic opposition in Taiwan and firm resolve in Beijing. This course focuses on political, economic, social, and intellectual trends on Taiwan, how they affect Taiwan's standing in the triangular Taiwan-China-U.S. relationship, and what this means for China, the United States, and international affairs. The first part of the course surveys Taiwan's history with an emphasis on political, economic, social and cultural trends since World War II. The course then discusses the evolution of Taiwan's role in world affairs, with special emphasis on the triangular relationship among Taiwan, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and the United States. 

 

IAFF 6318 The Political Economy of China, India, and Beyond

Comparative analysis of how development problems have been defined from both political and economic perspectives and the solutions proposed by outsiders and insiders. Provides an historical foundation for understanding how the concept of development has evolved in the large economies of East and South Asia as well as in the rising economies of Southeast Asia. Includes some

comparisons with the Middle East and Africa.

 

IAFF 6318 Current Issues in East Asia

This course will focus on several interlinked current major issues in East Asia, which due to their contingent nature are difficult to incorporate into regular curricular offerings. The course will examine how US policy towards four key players in the region, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China, has evolved during the past 20-some years, and how interactions with the other players is affecting these policies. US policymakers responsible for these countries and diplomats from these countries will be invited as guest speakers to the class in order to elaborate on a current issue facing their respective bureaus. Students will then be asked to develop responses to these requests, and present approaches to resolve these issues through their papers and class presentations. The course will examine the policy questions against the background of some of the overarching themes. These often don’t drive the debates on the issues of the day, but are important in the understanding of the background and the broader perspective.  1) Taiwan’s transition to democracy and its implications for today.  2) Japan’s rise as a responsible stakeholder, and its uneasy historical relations with some of its neighbors.  3) The tension between South Korea’s emergence as a regional power and its quest for unification. 4) China’s rise and its implications for the East Asia region as a whole.

 

IAFF 6318 Security Dynamics in the Indian Ocean Region

This course examines the increasingly contested Indian Ocean region with South Asian countries as its center. How does the changing big power competition in the Indian Ocean affect the national security calculations and foreign policy perspectives of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan? How do conventional threats of cross-border identity conflicts, terrorism, nuclear weapons and territorial disputes interact with emerging challenges of maritime balance of power shifts, climate change and digital security? The impact of external forces ranging from British colonialism to the current India-China rivalry has been deep on South Asia’s foreign, security and domestic structures and orientations. The course analytically considers foreign policy choices of these states and the domestic and international linkages that drive these decisions. We will explore how the region has been simultaneously evolving into a globalizing and dynamic area alongside increasing security pressures.

 

IAFF 6338 Ukraine & Georgia between Russia & the West

The current Russo‐Ukrainian crisis has regional and global ramifications, as did the 2008 Russo‐Georgian War. The course examines these conflicts and places them in the wider context of Russian‐Western relations, relations between Russia and its neighbors, and the relations between the West and Ukraine and Georgia. The policies of the relevant parties are analyzed against the backdrop of processes and issues such as NATO and EU enlargement, the “post‐Soviet” countries’ aspirations to define their national identities and roles in a wider European security order, Russia’s changing foreign policy, energy security, and domestic politics. The course combines a historical perspective with application of International Relations theory on issues such as national security decision making.

 

IAFF 6338 Politics of Russia

This course examines the driving forces that have shaped Russian politics and civil society. Students will learn about the nature of Russia’s political system, the points of view of leading Russian and Western analysts of Russian politics. Beginning with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the course proceeds to explore the development of contemporary Russia as it unfolds in the current media. We will investigate the role of political culture and civil society in regime transitions, analyze the significance of energy policy, economic foundations of power, informal practices regional politics, nationalism, religion, conflict areas, and popular mobilization, as well as the influence of networks and corruption.

 

IAFF 6338 Populism & Illiberalism in Europe

This course introduces students to the rise of illiberal movements in the “broader West”—focusing mostly on Europe, the US, and the post-Soviet space, with some detours through Turkey, Israel, and Brazil. It discusses the multifaceted challenges faced by democracies today such as global democratic backsliding; the rise of authoritarian leaders; the electoral successes of far-right and populist parties; and the of role social media in spreading disinformation, hate speech, and conspiracy theories. Students will develop skills in reading and analyzing quantitative and qualitative research at the intersection of social sciences and international affairs, and will increase their own literacy in identifying the structural changes that challenge democratic institutions.

 

IAFF 6358 Contemporary Issues of US-Mexico Relations

This course examines the current drivers of the US-Mexico relationship, and uses concrete policy issues and recent  junctures  of  the  relationship  to  explore  and understand both the policy and decision-making processes as well as the outcomes. It has an academic mooring but provides potential future practitioners–whether in government, the private sector or civil  society-with a toolkit to comprehend how decision-making  affecting ties between both nations is implemented. It will provide students with a holistic understanding of the multifaceted agenda that makes this relationship so unique for US foreign and domestic policy (trade and the economy, national security and law-enforcement, energy, migrant flows, border infrastructure, sustainability and water  resources, demographics, public diplomacy and Soft Power)  and  that underpins this singular bilateral relationship.The course  will  also  place  the US-Mexico relationship in a larger geostrategic context - North American,  hemispheric  and  global. This is not  a  "history of US-Mexico relations" course, though some readings on key defining moments will be required for context. The course will entail issue-driven policy simulation exercises throughout the semester in order to ensure that students understand both the issues but also the praxis of this vastly complex relationship.

 

IAFF 6358 Economic and Social Development of Latin America

This course takes a historical and comparative view to the economic, social and institutional evolution of Lain America and the Caribbean (LAC), and discusses the main interpretations about its past history, current conditions, and future scenarios, in the context of global economic and geopolitical changes and in comparison to other developing regions. Then it moves to the discussion of a variety of current public policies.The course will briefly discuss the colonial roots and independence, the period of growth in the second half of the 19th century, and the difficult decades of the first half of the 20th century marked by two world wars and the Great Depression. The main focus however, will be on the post WWII period, going through the period of import substitution and the Alliance for Progress, the shocks of the 1970s, the debt crisis of the 1980s, the period that started in the 1990s with a greater market orientation and democratic institutions, and the new and uncertain phase that opened after the financial crisis of 2009. That chronological discussion will take up the first part of the course. In the second half, the analysis will focus on current approaches and debates on different public policies related to macroeconomic, productive, social, and institutional aspects. This section of the course will discuss policies related to fiscal, monetary, financial, exchange rate, trade, labor, agriculture, industry, education, technology, infrastructure, health and nutrition, social protection, environmental issues, and democtratic governance.

 

IAFF 6358 International Relations of Latin America

The United States has been the preponderant power in the hemisphere since the early twentieth century. Prior to the midterm, we explore U.S. policies toward the region during the twentieth century and explanations for these policies.  In particular, during the Cold War, the U.S. and the USSR were considered the world’s two super powers and the U.S. was concerned about the threats presented by the USSR in Latin America; in most scholars’ views, however, the U.S. exaggerated the threats. We assess to what extent U.S. policies indeed reflected security threats by the USSR and to what extent economic concerns, democracy concerns, and/or features of the U.S. policy-making process. After the midterm, we explore the evolution of the power configuration in the hemisphere in the 2000s. Is the hemisphere unipolar?  Are China and Latin American “middle powers” rising?  If so, what kind of a challenge does China present and how does its role compare to the USSR’s during the Cold War?   And, if so, what does the increase in China’s and Latin American countries’ power mean for U.S. interests in the region? Is the U.S. achieving its goals on key issues of the hemispheric agenda, in particular the “war on drugs” and democratization?

 

IAFF 6378 Lebanon & Syria

This course explores the complicated link between Syria and Lebanon – from the time these territories were part of the Ottoman Empire until the present. In the process, the course focuses on the different political and economic trajectories the two states followed upon gaining independence from France; the domestic and external sources of their respective foreign policies; Lebanon’s slide towards civil war in 1975 and Syria’s intervention to end it; the politics of Syria’s domination of Lebanon and, ultimately, Syria’s withdrawal from the latter; and, finally, the civil war in Syria and its impact on Lebanon.
 

IAFF 6378 Religion and Society in the Middle East

Religion intersects deeply with social and political life in the Middle East, but in ways that vary considerably over time and place. In this course we will consider the relationship between religion on the one hand and law, social life, political regimes, political participation, authority, and public and policy debates. There will be a strong intra-regional comparative focus but also an attempt to draw comparisons with other regions.

 

IAFF 6378 State, Identity, and Foreign Policy in the Middle East

The State, for a long time, has been regarded as the unit of analysis in International Relations and Foreign Policy. However, with the continuous changes and fragility of certain States in the MENA region, it’s important to continuously revisit this premise and address the growing influence of identities (religious, ethnic, or sectarian) on the working of the State and its foreign policy tools. Through this seminar, students will be exposed to the different relevant theories and frameworks tackling foreign policy making in the Middle East. In addition, select case studies will be discussed but students are encouraged to bring other cases or issues to the discussion as well.

 

IAFF 6378 Oil: Industry, Economy, Society

Petroleum is one of the fastest-growing industries in the USA, and affects the fortunes of companies and nations. Most of the largest firms in the world are in petroleum.  This course takes a multidisciplinary approach (primarily political economy and management) to oil and its effects on business, nation-states, and the world economy. The first half of the course adopts a top-down viewpoint, examining the global oil environment. The second half is more bottom-up, using cases to grapple with industry issues.  The course is conducted in a mixture of seminar and lecture formats. A group proposal, paper, and presentation, as well as active class participation are expected, and constitute over half the assessment.

 

IAFF 6378 Arabic for International Affairs

This course is designed to enable students of international affairs to pursue successful careers in the Foreign Service, government, private or international agencies, as well as in fields such as politics, economics, media, business and finance. The course is designed to help students develop their communicative abilities and expand knowledge about Arabic for international affairs, customs, traditions and ways of life, to the extent that they will be able to perform tasks that a native speaker carries out in formal and informal situations. This course is for students at the high-Intermediate level and focuses on conversation skills, speaking, listening, writing, reading comprehension, continued vocabulary acquisition and terminology related to international affairs.

 

IAFF 6378 Refugees & Displaced People in Middle East

The UNHCR Refugee Agency estimates that there is nearly 22.5 million refugees in the world and 55% of them come from Africa and the Middle East. Also, there are now twice as many internally displaced people (IDPs) as there are refugees. Migration and displacement are far more complex and within this context, the course will explore factors underlying migration of peoples, the current trends and patterns of human movements in the greater context of global migrations, and in view of the influences of on-going conflicts, violene, and environmental disasters to list just few. The course will focus on the refugee and the IDP communities in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Through case studies, analysis and reflection, the course will engage students in examining the sheer scope of the crisis, analyzing the causes and consequences of displacement, the roots and underlying issues of injustice that impact refugee and IDP communities including vulnerable populations. In addition to investigating the profound implications when it comes to preventing, responding to and resolving displacement; and how the steady increase in displaced populations influence regional and world politics, and how resettlement became a contentious debate among the regional and international community alike. Students will also explore the general background on UN and other international agencies and organizations, regional human rights bodies, and in-country agencies involved with IDPs and refugees in light of the legal frameworks and policies that are designed to protect refugee and IDP populations.

 

IAFF 6385 The UN and Security in Africa

Of all regions of the world, Africa is undoubtedly the continent in which the United Nations (UN) is the most deeply invested in terms of peace and security. Africa hosts 7 of the ongoing 13 peacekeeping operations and several special political missions. African issues make up over 50% of the Security Council agenda; most of the sanctions regimes designed by the Council concern African countries; and the work of several UN entities active on human rights and humanitarian issues is largely focused on the continent. In dealing with peace and security issues in Africa, the UN has demonstrated a great deal of creativity to adapt to rapidly-evolving situations. It is in Africa that the UN launched its first enforcement mission (in the Congo in 1960); approved the first explicit protection of civilians mandate (in Sierra Leone in 1999); and established the first and so far only hybrid peacekeeping operation (UNAMID since 2007). The failure of the UN to prevent and stop the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda triggered some reform initiatives. More recently, the rise of terrorism in Africa has tested the key tenets of peacekeeping. An additional aspect of UN efforts relates to the growing partnership with the African Union (AU), which has given rise to a variety of coordination mechanisms and innovative cooperative arrangements. This development points to another important element: Africa’s contribution to UN work, which stands in contrast with the continent’s marginal role in the early years of the organization.

Against this backdrop, and from a practitioner’s perspective, this course pursues three main goals: First, to provide an overview of the scope of UN involvement in crisis prevention and management in Africa and an analysis of the tools used, the innovations introduced, and the extent to which these have enabled the organization to adapt to the environment it is operating in; second, to describe and analyze the partnership that the UN has built with the AU and its Regional Mechanisms and how it is shaping approaches to peace and security in Africa; and third, to provide the overall context within which UN role in Africa should be understood, including current challenges to peace and security in Africa, as well as the continent’s role within the organization in furtherance of its interests.

 

IAFF 6385 International Relations in Africa

This graduate seminar provides an intensive survey of the broad structures and processes of international politics and foreign policy in Africa since independence in 1960, and especially the more recent events that have shaped African international relations since the end of the Cold War. It will also focus on normative international relations theory by examining IR Security theories including realism, liberalism and the new globalisms in the context of Africa’s contemporary place in international relations. The course will base the analysis of African actors’ agency in global politics on major historical formations that inform current transformations in African affairs and how African politicians and political leaders navigate an increasingly complex international environment. Some of the themes addressed will include the legacies of the Cold War; economic constraints and opportunities and influence on foreign policies of African states; the increasing prominence of non-state actors in Africa’s international political and security arena; and the role of various continental and regional organizations in norm creation, economic integration, and conflict management. This course will be useful for anymore who wants to get a better understanding of foreign policy imperatives and formulation in Africa and their relevance to regional politics and security in the region.

 

IAFF 6385 U.S. Policy Toward Africa

This course will examine the evolution of interests, institutions, and instruments that have shaped U.S. engagement in Africa from the Cold War to the present day. In the first half of the semester, students will examine key pivot points in U.S.-Africa policy and debate the policy dilemmas and contradictions that competing interests and priorities have generated.  In the second half of the semester, students will analyze and debate contemporary issues in U.S.-Africa policy: How best should the U.S. respond to rising competition in Africa from China and other global actors? How will increasingly divergent governance and economic growth trajectories on the continent shape U.S. priorities and partnerships? How best, and through what instruments, should the U.S. engage African conflicts and security challenges? How is U.S. development assistance changing? What domestic and global factors are most likely to shape U.S. interest and engagement in Africa going forward? Students should come away with a more critical and nuanced understanding of U.S. engagement in post-independence Africa, and an ability to analyze and assess how new developments in Africa impact U.S. interests and policy choices.

 

IAFF 6501 Quantitative Analysis for International Affairs

This course is designed to provide a strong analytical foundation in elementary statistical reasoning and techniques, and the skills necessary to understand, evaluate, and critic, claims, and conventional wisdom and popular opinion. Topics include descriptive statistics; sampling and statistical inference; testing for differences between means; techniques for analyzing categorical data; correlation, and measures of association; summarizing and presenting statistical results; and some of the fundamental issues of research study design. The course is rigorous, but does not require an advanced mathematic background. Class time will be a mix of lecture, discussion, and hands-on computer work.

 

IAFF 6502 Cross Cultural Communications

The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively across cultures has become both more critical and more difficult in today’s global environment. The focus of the course will be development of cross-cultural communications/awareness, management, and negotiation skills. National, regional and universal levels of culture and communications will be explored. Course methodologies will include case studies, videos, simulation, and assessment instruments relative to communicating and working in multicultural settings. The course also uses a comparativist approach to flesh out the significance and implications of cultural underpinnings, factors, and variables necessary for successful communication between cultures and individuals in an increasingly globalized world.

 

IAFF 6502 Writing for International Affairs Professional

Professionals who are able to write well has a competitive advantage in their careers. They are able to clearly and quickly express their views and conclusions in written communications. Strong writing skills also sharpen organization and communication skills at all levels. The best strategic thinkers often are superior writers because of their ability to analyze and synthesize complex concepts and explain them in simple terms. Whether a student’s future is in policy development, public speaking, corporate management, law, or academia, this course provides tools to think through written communications and produce effective writing.

 

IAFF 6502 Public Speaking

Many aspects of daily life involve public speaking. Whether you are giving a toast at a social event or making a presentation before a professional audience, good public speaking skills are important, and can help you to make the right impression and further your career. This course will provide students the opportunity to learn (1) how to structure and organize a speech, (2) the elements of proper delivery, (3) the various speech types, (4) how to use visual aids, (5) how to encourage audience participation, and (6) how to identify topics. Students will present several speeches on different topics.

 

IAFF 6502 Alternative Analysis: Red Team

Members of both the 9/11 Commission and the WMD Commission expressed concerns that the U.S. intelligence community lacks imagination, does not "think outside the box," or challenge prevailing assumptions when analyzing threats to national security. Alternative analysis—often referred to as "red cell" or "red team”—uses various analytical methodologies to provide a more complete picture of issues than traditional analysis alone. Students will also be introduced to various methods or war gaming formats in which red teaming is applied. Students will be required to apply a variety of techniques used in red teaming and participate in a multi-sided war game.

 

IAFF 6502 Financial Statement Analysis

This course will provide an introduction to the analysis and interpretation of corporate financial statements. Emphasis will be given to placing financial information and its analysis within an actual market context. Students will learn basic financial analysis tools and apply them on real world examples. Special attention will be given to the analysis of multinational corporations and the financial performance of businesses in an international context.

 

IAFF 6502 Research Design for International Affairs

This course introduces students to a step-by-step approach to evaluating, producing and managing policy-relevant research in international affairs. Students learn and practice key skills, such as how to survey existing knowledge, formulate research questions, choose analytical methods, and organize research plans to produce rigorous and persuasive analysis. When deployed as part of a systematic approach, these skills help students produce quality papers and complete superior capstone projects or theses. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate a grasp of the research process by delivering the introduction to a research paper or proposal for a research project.

 

IAFF 6502 Restorative Justice

How a society responds to wrongdoing is critical to people’s perceived sense of security, belonging and justice. The state’s legal system plays an important role in establishing the rule of law and maintaining popular confidence in its ability to manage transgressions. However, in many parts of the world as in the U.S., the justice system is not always designed to adequately contribute to healing or peace but instead deepens societal divides and conflict. Restorative justice is an attempt to address some of these gaps.

 

IAFF 6502 Negotiation Skills

This course is designed to enhance the participants’ negotiation and leadership skills for managing differences between individuals and groups. Class members will learn how to handle two and multiparty negotiations, and analyze the importance of empathy and creative option design.  The course will be a blend of skill building exercises and discussions about the behavior of individuals to understand the negotiation dynamics.

 

IAFF 6502 Feminist Research Methodologies for Conflict-Affected Settings

This course is designed to orient students to the ethics and practice of feminist research within conflict-affected contexts. The course will include theoretical and practical elements focused on helping students to develop an intersectional feminist lens tuned into the relationship between power and knowledge production, the ethics of representation, and the challenges of navigating research in settings where individuals have been affected by violence. The overall goal of the course is to equip students will the skills necessary to apply the ethics and considerations of feminist praxis to various professional and academic endeavors. Students will have the opportunity to engage with a variety of participatory research methods from a feminist perspective, including photovoice, Everyday Peace Indicators, narrative, and ethnographic methods. This engagement will take place alongside broader class discussions which will explore how feminist approaches and sensitivities can be integrated into field work across disciplines and epistemologies, and within professional practice.

 

IAFF 6502 Writing for International Practitioners

Rapidly changing conditions, complex problems, and unexpected obstacles require national and international security decision-makers to respond in real-time. Their ability to make informed decisions depends on the timely delivery of high-quality written products used to inform and influence their thinking. Your ability to analyze and synthesize complex concepts and explain them in simple terms in the written form are essential to that process. If you are considering a career in national and international security policy, this course will provide you with the tools to produce efficient and effective written communication. 

 

IAFF 6502 STATA: Fundamentals

IAFF 6502 is a four-week Stata introduction course that will cover basics skills for students to get hands on using Stata for data analysis. This course provides a basic introduction to Stata software and its applications on data management, data analysis and econometric modeling.

 

IAFF 6502 International Non-Profit Management

The non-profit sector has grown exponentially in the last few decades – both domestically and internationally - and so have the competing demands to demonstrate data-driven results, raise public awareness and fundraise on multiple platforms. These competing demands require effective management skills to run non-profit organizations and achieve impact. Key skills include defining, understanding and ongoing assessment of an organization’s mission, communication and advocacy strategies, effective programs, development and financial targets, identification of fundraising opportunities and managing a team that may even meet in person regularly. This course will be taught by evaluating how to design a Non-Profit Organizational Capacity Mapping Framework and by discussing Case Studies in class. Prior reading of the Case Studies for each seminar class is required because the case studies will be taught using a Socratic Method with students explaining the Case Studies and Responding to questions by the Lecturer and other students. The themes that will be covered by both the case studies and the Capacity Mapping Framework will include lectures and discussions about Mission; Program/Theory of Change; Evaluation & Log Frames; Fundraising & Communication Strategies; NGO Management in the 21 st Century and Non-Profit Governance.

 

IAFF 6502 Participatory Planning

Participation is a fundamental concept to development. This course aims to build an appreciation of the nuances of participation and to impart specific methods and tools that facilitate participation. The course will cover the principles of participatory learning and action, provide helpful “Do’s” and “Don’t’s” of carrying out participatory activities and processes and touch on the caveats of participatory methods in the development industry.  The tools and methods covered in the course are drawn from community development planning, participatory rural/urban appraisal, participatory monitoring and evaluation, and participatory learning and action.

 

IAFF 6502 Public Opinion/Sentiment Analysis

The goals of the course are to make students conversant in survey research, better consumers of public opinion data and gain the ability to use survey data in their work—all without having to become a statistician! This course will offer specific examples of how public opinion data has been used to inform policymakers. This is followed by a comparison of the validity of traditional survey research methods versus the more newly arrived social media sentiment analysis. It will provide an overview of the different methods of data collection as well as an introduction to sampling and questionnaire design and quality control measures. Students will then be exposed to how data is interpreted and used to form the backbone of pithy and cogent analyses. The course will conclude with an exercise in which students will review a data set and draft a policy memo based on a particular theme.

 

IAFF 6503 Analyzing International Economic Data

The course will use trade, investment, and other economic data sources to examine international trade and economic topics including: trade in agricultural products and other goods, U.S. trade in oil, international trade in services, activities of multinational companies, international foreign direct investment, and GDP growth. Students will use economic statistics and tools available on the web or from Gelman’s Online Library. Students will gain hands on experience using merchandise and services trade flows, foreign direct investment stocks and flows, balance of payments data, and foreign exchange rates. The course includes practical instruction on several types of online resources to specify data queries. Students will be asked to download economic statistics and manipulate electronic data in spreadsheets. The course will expose students to sources, terminology, and definitions unique to the analysis of international economic data. Students will be graded based on weekly attendance and class participation, three out-of-class assignments, a take home final exam, and a brief in class presentation that applies the skills learned in class

 

IAFF 6503 Formal Briefing

This course explores the why, what, and how of creating and presenting information to an audience. It will start with why briefings are an important mode of expression, and why storytelling is the single most important consideration in conceptual design.

 

IAFF 6503 Alternative Analysis: Red Team

Members of both the 9/11 Commission and the WMD Commission expressed concerns that the U.S. intelligence community lacks imagination, does not "think outside the box," or challenge prevailing assumptions when analyzing threats to national security. Alternative analysis—often referred to as "red cell" or "red team”—uses various analytical methodologies to provide a more complete picture of issues than traditional analysis alone. Students will also be introduced to various methods or war gaming formats in which red teaming is applied. Students will be required to apply a variety of techniques used in red teaming and participate in a multi-sided war game.

 

IAFF 6503 Leadership and Teamwork

This course explores the dynamics of teambuilding, communication, and leadership that will increase managerial effectiveness. Topics include: communication and conflict, decision-making and problem-solving, teams vs. groups, group dynamics, consensus, team building and leadership.  Students participate in experiential exercises that provide them with the opportunity to learn critical skills needed to improve teamwork and be effective organizational members.

 

IAFF 6503 Conflict & Corruption: Resource Curse

This is an advocacy-focused skills class where we use the case study of the "resource curse" as an entry point to learning and practicing how to develop and deliver a policy advocacy strategy. The “resource curse” is a widely accepted phenomenon; countries rich in natural resources are more prone to conflict and corruption than their resource-poor neighbors. This course will first explore the theory behind the “curse”, will examine case studies, and will tackle the policy implications of the resource curse for the US policymaker community. This is a skills course, not an effort to cover the comprehensive scholarship on the resource curse or its economic or national security implications.

 

IAFF 6503 Structured Analytic Techniques

This course introduces students to qualitative structured analytic techniques that they will be able to use across disciplines to help solve analytic problems. This course shows students how to use these techniques to approach analytic challenges and produce useful, insightful analysis. In numerous hands-on exercises, students practice specific skills to help them overcome mindsets, organize information, diagnose problems, explore different ways of thinking, and avoid surprise.

 

IAFF 6503 Negotiation Skills

This course is designed to enhance the participants’ negotiation and leadership skills for managing differences between individuals and groups. Class members will learn how to handle two and multiparty negotiations, and analyze the importance of empathy and creative option design.  The course will be a blend of skill building exercises and discussions about the behavior of individuals to understand the negotiation dynamics.

 

IAFF 6503 Developing Effective Proposals

The course will provide students with the nuts and bolts of developing the effective, winning proposal, including overview and management of the proposal development process, including project design and field assessments, analyzing a procurement opportunity, preparing a technical proposal and budget, developing a monitoring and evaluation plan, and planning project staffing. The course will explore ways to work in partnership with local organizations, stakeholders, and the project’s ultimate beneficiaries. Team work is an essential aspect of developing successful proposals. Practitioners will gain a better understanding of ways to create better development projects, anticipate challenges, work with a variety of stakeholders, and address challenges effectively.

 

IAFF 6503 Analyzing International Economic Data

The course will use trade, investment, and other economic data sources to examine international trade and economic topics including: trade in agricultural products and other goods, U.S. trade in oil, international trade in services, activities of multinational companies, international foreign direct investment, and GDP growth. Students will use economic statistics and tools available on the web or from Gelman’s Online Library.

 

IAFF 6503 Writing for Intelligence Professionals

Writing in the Intelligence Community differs considerably from traditional academic submissions. Especially in the public sector in the early stages of your career, you are “known by how well you write.” What you write also depends in large measure on the type of information you are trying to impart and equally important – your audience. This course will focus on the various types of writing you will likely encounter in the intelligence world. Writing requires practice and this course will involve a series of short written assignments, plus in-class practical exercises covering the types of written products routinely encountered in the intelligence community.

 

IAFF 6503 Gender Advisor: Roles & Skills

This course will cover the various roles, responsibilities, and necessary skills of a Gender Advisor in multilateral, bilateral, and international development organizations. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of how the latest tools, resources, and practices should be applied in development work. The course will translate the new and evolving set of policies on gender integration/mainstreaming into meaningful practice to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of institutions and organizations seeking to promote peace, security and development through gender mainstreaming of policies, programs, and projects in developing countries as well as leading organizations to improve their internal gender equality.

 

IAFF 6503 Gender Responsive Budgeting

This 1-credit, innovative and participatory skills class, will introduce graduate students to the process of building gender responsive government budgets, doing gender-responsive sector planning, and integrating gender into development proposals and project budgets in order to support the sector planning. The course will explore how to engage all the necessary stakeholders in order to secure buy-in, the advocacy that must be undertaken, and the process of monitoring budgets once they have been finalized. Students will study proposals, case studies and organizational reports. This course meets on Saturday, April 4 and Sunday, April 5, 2020 from 9-5pm each day.

 

IAFF 6503 Mobile Phones for International Development

The mobile phone is rapidly bringing communication to the most remote areas of the world. NGOs, governments and companies alike are beginning to realize the potential of this ubiquitous tool to address a variety of global challenges. This weekend skills course will explore successful applications that facilitate economic transactions, transform agricultural processes, support public health campaigns and connect learners to educational content. It will also critically engage with issues of equity, privacy and access. This is the fourth time that this class has been offered and the tenth skills institute that TechChange has facilitated at GW. Students can expect a dynamic learning environment with a number of real-world case studies, custom animations and video tutorials as well as practical activities designed to apply new skills and strategies.

 

IAFF 6504 International Proficiency: Spanish

Intermediate Proficiency- Spanish is a topics-in-international-affairs course taught in Spanish. It meets once a week throughout the semester. Students who register for the course are expected to have studied Spanish previously for two or more years at the college level. Those who come into the course with less Spanish will probably find discussions to be difficult to follow and participate in actively.  Weekly attendance and frequent participation are essential for grading purposes (based on the quality of participation/comments).

 

IAFF 6504 International Proficiency: French

The primary objective of IAFF 6504 is to develop professional language skills for international affairs students and to train students to read and discuss international and cultural issues in French. The emphasis of the course is on reading comprehension and conversation skills. This course uses current news and international issues in French as a basis for training students to read magazine and newspaper articles, to watch and to understand the French news from a French TV channels as well as to discuss topics in French. Class time will be devoted to reading, discussion and vocabulary building activities.

 

IAFF 6504 International Proficiency: Chinese

This Intermediate-High Chinese class is designed to engage you as a student in acquiring communication skills, and developing more sophisticated techniques about the Chinese language at the Intermediate-High level; and by laying the foundation of language as the cornerstone, to prepare you in the areas of Chinese studies should you choose to do so. To achieve this goal, the professor proposes a series of lectures, dialogues, and discussions. By participating in this Intermediate-High Chinese class, students will learn and study advanced materials in speaking and reading projects.

 

IAFF 6504 International Proficiency: Arabic

This class will introduce graduate students to main sources of Arabic media and allow them to compare and contrast news sources through analysis. The course is conducted in Arabic and is intended to enable students to develop language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the advanced level of the ACTFL Guidelines for proficiency, and to build on their knowledge of some salient aspects of Arab culture. This course assumes students to be active learners and to take responsibility for their own learning, under guidance from their instructor. Class time will be spent on doing interactive activities, such as discussing and applying the readings to media texts. It is imperative that students come to class each day with assigned materials thoroughly prepared.

 

IAFF 6504 International Proficiency: Russian

Intermediate Proficiency Russian is intended to improve the students’ skills in Russian (speaking, listening, reading and writing) through different activities - students’ interviewing each other, working in discussion groups, watching Russian TV news program, listening to the news in Russian, reading newspaper articles from Russian press or Internet, doing translation exercises on the vocabulary studied and the grammar reviewed, performing dialogues etc.

IAFF 6118 Women and Leadership in Africa

The course will provide a general understanding of the position and challenges of women in Africa as leaders at the community, society and national levels. Assessing the cultural environment, impediments/barriers and recognize the progress made (through various legal frameworks and policies), as well as opportunities. Ambassador MulaMula will share her practical experience over the years in various leadership positions in public service, as well as draw on living and current examples of women in politics(what it takes to win an election), conflict situations and transitional leadership. The objective is to create self-awareness, confidence, aspirations with clear goals, mindsets and overcome stereotypes of women and leadership.

 

IAFF 6118 Applied Qualitative Methods

The objective for this course is for students to become consumers and producers of scholarly research and knowledge. Students will become familiarized with various qualitative methodologies, focusing on methods in international relations. Students develop skills in determining how suitable, applicable, or useful various methods are likely to be in different circumstances and settings, given the research question. Students will engage with scholarly research in the field via reading, commenting on, and critiquing the work of others, including journal articles and the work of classmates. The activities and assignments in the course build toward a draft research design. This project and other activities are designed to give students as close to real-world and hands-on experience in research, in the online classroom. As such, the class will utilize experiential learning activities and will make extensive use of discussion boards and out-of-class material.

 

IAFF 6138 Social Enterprise & Development

The future of successful business leaders will be defined by the ability to create, build and sustain organizations with and for mission and finance related returns. In light of changing organizational structures (from C corp. to B corp.), coupled with the growing focus on entrepreneurship and innovation, emerging leaders should be prepared to understand the core concepts of building a sustainable business and securing capital for impact. This course will engage students in understanding the core principles of social entrepreneurship, also known as the demand side of investing for impact. For students interested in pursuing careers in social finance, philanthropy, investment management, or responsible banking, this course is a must have.

 

IAFF 6138 Development and Technology

This course will introduce students to the role of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) in achieving international development goals. Students will explore the opportunity technology plays as a catalyst in social impact and will explore practical implementations of technologies and analyze their overall utility in the sector. The course will analyze field based realities and explore the practically of technology as a solution for key challenges faced in the agriculture, health, gender and education sectors (among others). Overall, students will take a holistic review of the international development sector and will review case-studies of ICT implementations across regions of interest including Africa, Asia and the Americas. Students will also have the opportunity to connect with leaders in the ICT4D sector as guest lecturers will be invited to explain their background and experience in the sector.

 

IAFF 6138 Development Project Implementation

Congratulations, your development project has been funded! This graduate seminar takes you through the process of implementing a development project from kick-off to exit. Combining theory and practice in weekly case study settings, you will learn how to navigate and overcome implementation challenges, such as making sense of conflicting monitoring data, managing donor expectations, and achieving project sustainability. Through experiential learning approaches, you ultimately will build crucial skillsets for a future career in development.

 

IAFF 6138 Rule of Law & Anti-Corruption

Vice President Biden, during his first visit to Ukraine, described corruption as the cancer of society. The same idea was picked up by former USAID Administrator Shah and State Department Assistant Secretary Nuland. There is a renewed effort by the foreign policy, national security and foreign assistance experts to understand the destabilizing role of corruption and to come up with solutions that counter corruption. Rampant corruption was one of the most important driving forces behind the Maidan in Ukraine and the Arab Spring uprising. Under the pressure from the Maidan and the civil society, the government of Ukraine recently adopted new anti-corruption legislation. In this class we will explore corruption as a mobilizing force in fragile societies and how anti-corruption can be integrated into sound development programming. A recent study by USAID has shown that most of the foreign assistance programs in the anticorruption arena concentrate on the rule of law activities. The weakness of the rule of law undermines the effectiveness of the democratic institutions and jeopardizes democratic transitions in the post-communist countries of Eastern Europe. How to better integrate the rule of law and anti-corruption into democratization assistance is not well-understood by development professionals. This class will work on honing a practical understanding of the theory of the rule of law, good governance and anti-corruption and the ways to design foreign assistance programs that address these functional areas in the context of democratic assistance in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

 

IAFF 6138 Climate Change & Smallholder Agriculture

Farming small pieces of land has been the most common livelihood since the beginning of the Holocene epoch. That is still the case today for a half billion people – about 6.5% of the global population. Yet, throughout the global South, climate change is raising ground and surface air temperatures, intensifying droughts, and radically disordering seasonal rainfall patterns. The emergent effects are redefining the viability of agricultural livelihoods for hundreds of millions of smallholder farmers, many of whom already live in exceedingly precarious socioeconomic, political, and ecological circumstances.

 

Two questions structure the course. First, how is climate change impacting smallholder agricultural systems? Second, where smallholder agriculture is concerned, what measures—especially those related to policy—can be appropriate and effective for climate change adaptation? Along the way, we will emphasize themes and debates related to poverty, gender, climate-smart agriculture, technology (and its limits), rural outmigration, food security, ecology, and, of course, politics.

 

Upon completing this course, you should have a concrete understanding of how climate change is impacting agricultural systems, and what policy measures can make sense for helping smallholder farmers adapt to it. You should also see improvements in your ability to analyze, evaluate, and write about research and policy.

IAFF 6138 Gender and Development

This graduate-level seminar will begin by examining the evolution of theoretical approaches regarding gender and development and the debates that have emerged over how to promote gender equity and rights across the gender spectrum. We will then consider some of the key issues in the field of gender and development and the challenges and successes that development practitioners have experienced in addressing gender inequalities. Throughout the course, we will seek to identify general patterns and lessons with broader applications as well as to recognize differences within and between societies. We will use a combination of academic sources, international development reports, and other materials produced by development practitioners to ground our discussions and study how organizations have sought to implement gender-sensitive approaches to development. The assignments are practical and relevant to professional work in the field of gender and development.

 

IAFF 6138 Bottom-Up Development

From William Easterly to Dambisa Moyo, and from Jeffrey sachs to Paul Collier, development thinkers have expressed both considerable frustration with policies, programs, strategies and institutions charged with alleviating poverty, as well as the need to focus additional resources on or reformed actions toward populations at the ‘bottom.’ Despite the analyses and fretting, and resultant actions, hundreds of millions, if not more than a billion, of the earth’s population remains tragically poor, somehow managing to survive on $2.00 a day or less. This graduate seminar takes these analyses, frustrations and unsatisfactory results as a starting point to delve into prospects for more effective poverty alleviation through the application of ‘bottom-up’ approaches. After briefly examining failings of foreign aid from both grassroots and top-down perspectives, the focus turns to bottom-up approaches, casting an eye on evolutionary aspects, critical components, and current applications. Subsequently, attention is placed on how poor people manage to survive, and in some cases get ahead, with few resources, before turning to an examination of several increasingly noted mechanisms responding to poor people’s needs for assistance to improve their economic standing. The seminar closes with consideration of the pros and cons of these mechanisms and approaches, and their prospects for achieving poverty alleviation from the bottom-up.

 

IAFF 6158 Science Diplomacy

Reflecting on the range of global problems and opportunities requiring scientific knowledge, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright argued at the turn of the millennium, “diplomats must have scientists in our ranks and by our side.” Indeed, scientists have played an essential role in world affairs since science and technology moved to the center of international diplomacy at the dawn of the nuclear age. Despite this longstanding relationship between science and geopolitics, “science diplomacy” only recently has been identified as a distinct form of diplomacy with specialized purpose, applications, and agents. By examining international and existential issues such as climate change, public health, weapons of mass destruction, biotechnology, and geophysical and space research, we will explore how science and diplomacy co-evolved to produce new modes of knowledge production and

communication, novel forms of international organization, and standards for professional practice. During this course we will come to identify the comparative advantages and disadvantages of official and unofficial diplomacy as it relates to scientists. We will debate whether science diplomacy belongs under the banner of “soft power,” “hard power,” or “smart power.” A recurring question in this course: who are science diplomats? Are they trained diplomats and government officials who draw on scientific knowledge to facilitate international cooperation; or, are they scientists who capitalize on their expertise to influence and organize policy across national boundaries? This course will reveal that this distinction is both real and significant for international policymaking.

 

IAFF 6163 Transnational Security

This course focuses on transnational security issues and considers how many of these myriad challenges threats to global peace and security constitute. The combined effects of such transnational security issues such as drug, weapons, human trafficking, piracy, acts of terrorism, infectious disease, and deliberate environmental destruction, along with such critical enablers such as corruption, and money movements, are not strangers on the world stage. What is new is their global reach and destructive potential. As a result, these issues have made policy makers consider different conceptions of security and, at times, to move beyond sole considerations of state sovereignty into the realm of human security.

 

IAFF 6165 Fundamentals of Intelligence

This course focuses on the craft of U.S. Intelligence and its role in national security policy. It will examine the changing organizational structure of the Intelligence Community, including its homeland security component; the Intelligence production cycle, including tasking, collection, analysis, covert action, and counterintelligence; and relations between the Intelligence and Policy communities.

 

IAFF 6171 Introduction to Conflict Resolution

This course provides students with an introduction to the field of conflict analysis and resolution. It is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry and application. The course will introduce students to the major concepts and issues currently animating the field, explore the main strategies for responding to conflicts, and help them recognize and critique the assumptions upon which these strategies rest. This course considers the “upper end” of the conflict spectrum, focusing on inter-state disputes, contemporary civil wars, complex political emergencies and other forms of organized violence. At the end of the course students should be acquainted with the nature of conflict resolution as a distinct theoretical and applied field of study and have some understanding of current thinking about major approaches to war prevention, mitigation, settlement, and post-war reconstruction projects. It will be useful for anyone with an interest in conflict resolution and management, including professionals in the fields of diplomacy, journalism, development assistance, humanitarian aid or international peacekeeping who wish to develop their knowledge of this important area.

 

 

IAFF 6173 Security and Development

With much of the world faced with recurrent crises, vulnerable communities in fragile environments struggle to build resiliency and achieve long-term sustainable development. International development actors strive to halt the deteriorating cycles of violence by reducing the adverse impact of a myriad of stressors, that if left unchecked leads to chronic conflict and or opportunities for violent extremism. This course begins by introducing development and how it seeks to strengthen fragile states, mitigate conflict, prevent violent extremism, and build the resilience of at-risk communities and institutions. Using a case study approach, the course will dive into specific examples of how development initiatives apply sectoral approaches to achieving sustainable outcomes in conflict and post-conflict settings. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of navigating in insecure transitional environments. Employing a practical approach, the course will examine various actors and their roles and motivations on the ground, types of initiatives frequently implemented and funded by leading donors, how initiatives are monitored and evaluated to assess progress, and how development workers operate in insecure challenging contexts. This practical knowledge will be contextualized through prevalent literature on the subject.

 

 

IAFF 6186 United States National Security

This course examines the problems and issues confronting American national security policymakers using a combination of empirical information and conceptual analysis. The course content includes conceptual definitions of national security, policymaking processes and debates, national security institutions and organizations, relationships between foreign, economic and defense policy, and civil-military relations. The course presumes familiarity with American politics and U.S. history and encourages students to keep up on relevant world events by reading legitimate news sources. At the end of the semester, students should be able to critically engage, understand, articulate and explain ideas and arguments about the U.S. national security process and the complexity of American strategic interests and decision-making processes.

 

IAFF 6186 Stabilization & Peacebuilding

This course aims to provide students with a solid introduction to the theory and practice of contemporary stabilization and reconstruction missions. It will help students analyze state fragility and failure, develop a shared understanding of the many elements and challenges in stabilization-reconstruction missions as well as well as basic requirements for a successful mission. Theories and concepts will be tested by examining disparate cases during the course.

 

IAFF 6186 International Organized Crime

This course will examine a variety of transnational organized criminal groups, their modus operandi, and their illicit activities. It also will focus on some domestic organized crime groups both to provide a depth of understanding of the operations of organized criminal activity in different countries, as well as to show how inroads might be made into domestic markets if done in cooperation with local groups.

IAFF 6186 Who Will Rule the 21st Century?

Today, we are witnessing a period of even greater American economic travails, greater national debt relative to the size of the economy, and the concern that less friendly powers—especially China and Russia—may be poised to benefit from the relative decline of the United States in specific and the West in general.  The Sanders and Trump phenomena of 2016 are perhaps the most dramatic manifestations of these concerns—and the election of Donald Trump as president could be the most consequential manifestation of such anxieties since the beginning of the Cold War, or at least the end of the Vietnam War.  But beyond immediate electoral changes, what do these shifting economic realities, as well as broader changes in global demographics and developments in technology, bode for the future of American power and ultimately the security of this country and its allies?

This course, informed by both historical and technical perspectives, will wrestle with such broad questions about the architecture of the international power system.  It will consider the relative decline of the United States and many of its major western allies that many consider to be already underway, and only likely to accelerate.  It will examine the promise of the rising powers, together with the structural constraints and other impediments that they will have to face themselves as they seek greater stature, clout, and prosperity in the 21st century.  It will also consider plausible war scenarios and other threats to civilization and the planet.

 

IAFF 6186 Insurgency & Counterinsurgency

This course provides students with an introduction to the nature of insurgency, some key historical examples of how insurgencies were defeated, and analytical frameworks and tools for understanding and countering insurgencies. It is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry into related topics such as irregular warfare, security and development, stabilization and peacebuilding, responses to terrorism, and conflict resolution. The course examines the multidisciplinary nature of insurgencies, and introduces students to the major concepts and issues of the topic, explores the main types of insurgencies, and analyzes in depth a number of strategic cases of counterinsurgency to help students understand the complexity and the variety of this form of warfare in the modern world. The course provides key frameworks for analysis for the study of insurgency and explores possible solutions to a number of current conflicts.

 

IAFF 6186 Political Violence & Terrorism

Civil wars, processes of organized political violence, and terrorist campaigns have replaced inter-state wars as the main source of battle deaths and forceful displacement of persons since the end of World War II. These forms of organized violence have determined the fate and legitimacy of numerous regimes in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Balkans and eastern Europe, albeit they have also had significant political impact in North America and Europe. Even more important, these forms of violence affected whole populations, generating countless victims that, more often than not, were civilian and innocent.

 

The goal of this class is to provide the students with rigorous means to understand the relationship between politics and violence within internal conflict and terrorist campaigns. It will introduce students to both historical case studies, and to the theoretical approaches that try to leverage social, political, economic, and ideological dimensions as explanatory and interpretative tools.

The historical case studies will include examples from around the world, including North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa and the Middle East. We will study their initial causes, violent struggle, and eventual conclusion reached by either peace accords or military victories. Books, novels (excerpts), films, journal articles, and data sets will constitute our sources.

 

We will have a brief political theory introduction to the debate on the relationship between political power and violence (i.e. “political power grows out the barrel of the guns” vs “politics are a dialogue while violence is the absence of a dialogue”). The theoretical approaches will follow the recent debates within the academic literature on “Civil Wars”. They will offer both qualitative and quantitative, individual (i.e. rational choice) and collective (i.e. contentious politics), political, economic, military, and cultural avenues to make sense of these very often murky cases of political violence and terrorism.

 

IAFF 6186 Military Power & Effectiveness

This course explores what enables some states to harness their capacity effectively to execute state policy. The majority of this course assesses the theoretical and empirical literature, classifying how various works define military power and effectiveness, what level of analysis they address, and how well they explain power and effectiveness. We will devote most of our attention to conventional military power and operations, but will also address counterinsurgency and the power and effectiveness of rebel organizations.

 

IAFF 6186 Piracy & Irregular Threats

Pirates have captured global attention and imaginations for centuries. Yet how pirates operate, and how they support or intersect with a diverse web of irregular challenges, is often flattened by one dimensional portrayals in the media. This course will leverage piracy as a means to explore a multifaceted world of irregular threats in several global hotspots, including the Horn of Africa and the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. It will provide students with an introduction to the scholarship on contemporary piracy and investigate other non-state actors (e.g., insurgents, terrorists, drug traffickers) through the lens of their relationship to piracy. The course will also offer an opportunity to critically examine policies that aim to counter piracy and the relationship of those policies to a wider constellation of irregular threats. Finally, the course will use piracy as a lens to explore questions of political violence at sea. The course will be useful for anyone with an interest in historical and contemporary piracy, the application of seapower in unconventional settings, or breaking down barriers between the study of different types of non-state violence.

 

IAFF 6186 Emerging Threats

This course surveys emerging risks and challenges that threaten human, national and global security. It does so by paying special attention to a range of military and non-military issues where science and technology play a major role. Topics covered include how to think about the concepts of risk and securitization; revolutions in military affairs and hybrid warfare; the challenges of nuclear security and terrorism; conflict in cyberspace; the uses and consequences of robotics, drones and autonomous weapons systems; military developments in biotechnology; artificial intelligence; as well as non-military issues related to demography, urbanization, public health, the environment, and outer space. For each issue, the course examines the politics of scientific and technological evolution by identifying the key drivers of change; the nature of threats at the local, national, and global levels; and how existing security policies should be reformed in response. A technical background is not required but will enhance one’s understanding.

IAFF 6186 Cybersecurity

This course will provide an overview of current issues in the realm of cybersecurity, focusing on policy and conflict from a U.S. and international perspective.  We will begin with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and consider the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity.  Through the use of case studies, we will examine previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations.  We will analyze the roles of several different types of actors in cybersecurity including state actors, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups and private sector responses.  This course will also examine the issue of cyber deterrence, and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors.  Technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

 

IAFF 6216 Economic Tools for Global Policy

In this course, MIPP Online students will analyze economic issues and concrete economic policy problems. This course examines questions such as: How does economic policy affect technology and immigration - and vice versa? What are the implications of various trade policies on the global economy? How has globalization and rapid spread of high-tech communication influenced the US economy?

IAFF 6358 Racial & Ethnic Politics in Latin America

This course explores the changing and complex interactions between racial and ethnic politics and hegemonic power in Latin America. It asks questions such as: what are the strengths, weaknesses, and strategies of afro-descendent and ethnic social movements? Why do they succeed or fail? Why are they strong or weak in different countries? Why do we have successful indigenous political parties in Bolivia and Ecuador but not in Peru and Guatemala, nor successful black movements in Colombia and Brazil?

 

IAFF 6385 Peace & Conflict in Africa

This advanced seminar is designed to enable students to understand, analyze, and effectively communicate about contemporary African conflict dynamics and to sharpen their ability to craft policy and program recommendations for strengthening peace and security on the continent. The course combines the perspectives of both theory and practice, conflict analysis and the art of peacebuilding, and will survey prominent conflict case studies and emerging trends, such as popular protests, violent extremism, and transnationalism, as well as the actors, institutions, groups, and drivers that characterize them, in order to develop a conceptual framework to analyze and transform armed conflict in Africa.

 

IAFF 6501 Quantitative Analysis for International Affairs Practitioners

This course will introduce graduate students to methods and tools for the collection, management, analysis, and presentation of qualitative data in international development settings, thereby preparing them to contribute, as qualitative researchers, to the further improvement and expansion of "legitimate practice" in development research.

 

 

IAFF 6502 Formal Briefing

Of the many modes of communication in Washington, perhaps the most common is the formal briefing. Consequently, the ability to conceptualize, build, and deliver briefings is a valuable skill in both private and public sectors. This course will provide students the opportunity to learn: (1) public speaking techniques; (2) the various types of briefings; (3) how to structure and organize each; (4) different briefing venues, varied audiences and how to work with them; (5) the elements of proper delivery and how to develop a personally tailored briefing style. Students will design, build, and present one briefing twice. The first briefing will be a draft and the second a final.

 

IAFF 6502 Leadership & Teamwork

This course explores the dynamics of teambuilding, communication, and leadership that will increase managerial effectiveness. Topics include: communication and conflict, decision-making and problem-solving, teams vs. groups, group dynamics, consensus, team building and leadership. Students participate in experiential exercises that provide them with the opportunity to learn critical skills needed to improve teamwork and be effective organizational members.

 

 

IAFF 6502 Deconstructing Disinformation

A functional democracy requires the public to trust the information they rely on to make decisions. While numerous types of problematic information – including disinformation, misinformation, and propaganda – have always existed, networked technologies make it easier for media manipulators to spread inaccurate, misleading, and hateful information. In 2018, thirteen Russians were indicted for waging a three-year disinformation campaign to disrupt American democracy. Non-state actors also sought to incite partisanship and strategically suppress participation in the 2016 election. Extremist groups and partially automated accounts (“bots”) run by foreign state groups both propagated false rumors and conspiracies after a school shooting to shape the political reaction. The stock market lost over $130B in 2013 when a false tweet claimed that Barack Obama was injured in an explosion. And researchers are now confirming common sense about such damaging gossip: false information spreads faster than the truth.

 

This course will use domestic and international case studies to critically examine the key components of disinformation, including content creation, algorithmic amplification, normalization and sense-making. It will then analyze potential interventions by governments, technology companies, and civil society organizations. In addition to deconstructing the problem of disinformation and critically analyzing potential solutions, students will learn how to conduct scenario planning exercises.

 

IAFF 6502 Negotiation Skills

This course is designed to enhance the participants’ negotiation and leadership skills for managing differences between individuals and groups. Class members will learn how to handle two and multiparty negotiations, and analyze the importance of empathy and creative option design. The course will be a blend of skill building exercises and discussions about the behavior of individuals to understand the negotiation dynamics. The course builds on the concepts of interest-based negotiation developed by Roger Fisher at the Harvard Program on Negotiation.

 

 

IAFF 6502 Cross Cultural Communications

The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively across cultures has become both more critical and more difficult in today’s global environment. The focus of the course will be development of cross-cultural communications/awareness, management, and negotiation skills. National, regional and universal levels of culture and communications will be explored. Course methodologies will include case studies, videos, simulation, and assessment instruments relative to communicating and working in multicultural settings. The course also uses a comparativist approach to flesh out the significance and implications of cultural underpinnings, factors, and variables necessary for successful communication between cultures and individuals in an increasingly globalized world.

 

IAFF 6502 Introduction to Gaming & Simulation

The course will review collaborative analysis techniques that have been developed to game out or simulate issues and situations of significance. The course presents an overview of public and private sector applications of these methods for analysis and training. It will also provide detailed descriptions of various approaches and their conceptual underpinnings. The course is divided into three sections: familiarization, experiential learning, and design – the last focusing on application. Working in teams, students will select and apply one of the identified methodologies to the analysis of a specific topic. Topics are subject to instructor approval. The course will consist of lectures, a limited number of readings, and a heavy emphasis on students.

 

IAFF 6502 Writing for International Affairs

Successful international affairs professionals inform and influence through clear and concise writing. Effective writers create a foundation for knowledge, decision, and action by efficiently providing context and logically presenting relevant evidence. The ability to anticipate a leader's needs and identify challenges, opportunities, and options distinguishes policy from academic writing. In this course, we will use short written assignments, guided discussions, tailored feedback, and exercises to hone the skills of accuracy, brevity, clarity, and readability. While this is a writing course, students select a current policy challenge to focus on. Successful students will leave this class with an improved ability to analyze problems and craft written products suitable for policy leaders. Specific skills will include the ability to assess confusing and conflicting sources, explain complex problems, develop recommendations, start with your bottom line, and write with proper syntax and grammar. Students who apply themselves will leave the course with a high-quality writing sample to complement their job search.

 

IAFF 6502 U.S. Foreign Assistance

Why does the U.S. give foreign assistance? How much does it cost? What does the U.S. spend foreign assistance on? This course will explore these questions and cover the way the federal budget process is supposed to work and the way it actually does work, with a specific focus on the U.S. foreign assistance budget implemented by the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development. Goals of the Course: · Develop an understanding of what happens behind the scenes to develop the President’s Budget · Explore the responsibilities of the Office of Management and Budget and the Department of State’s Office of U.S. Foreign Assistance Resources in formulating and executing the foreign assistance budget for the Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development · Understand the role of Congress in the federal budget, with a focus on the appropriations process as it relates to State/USAID foreign assistance · Learn how to formulate a piece of the foreign assistance budget and how to analyze an appropriations bill. Better comprehend today’s complicated fiscal environment and its impact on the federal budget.

 

IAFF 6503 Violence Against Women in Latin America

Violence against women has been one of the most densely legislated areas in Latin America. Since the 1994 Inter-American Convention of the Prevention, Punishment, And Eradication of Violence Against Women (also known as the Belem do Para Convention), there has been multiple legislations in countries in the region to contain the crises. In fact in the 90s, 14 countries in Latin America implemented legislation on domestic or intrafamily violence. A second generation of laws to prevent not only physical violence but also additional forms of violence, such as economic or psychological violence, was enacted in the first half of the 2000s to address women’s broader cultural and social subordination. In this seminar we will understand the changes that implemented this evolution in legal documents and the progression from the Belem do Para Convention to the promotion of the Inter-American Model Law to Prevent, Punish and Eradicate the Violent Death of Women (Femicide-Feminicide). We will focus on the concerns about the institutionalization of Violence Against Women laws as effective practices and problems on implementation to visualize the confines of the law in certain social settings.

 

IAFF 6503 Non-Violent Communication

In an age of virulent civic discourse, avoiding conversations about domination, systems, power, race, gender, or sexual orientation is no longer an option. When emotions surface and stakes are high, this course will equip students with the tools to respond in a way that draws people into a conversation using Nonviolent Communication (NVC). NVC is a set of ideas and practices based on the empathic and relational nature of human beings that can be integrated into a way of being in the world.

 

IAFF 6503 Political Analysis

The objective of the course is to improve each student's ability to analyze a complex policy situation and craft a paper dealing with some aspect of that situation.

IAFF 6101 International Affairs Cornerstone

This course covers political, economic, and social theories of international relations and their applications to practice.

Registration is restricted to graduate students in International Affairs, Global Communication, and International Policy and Practice programs only. This course is intended for first-year graduate students only. Also register for one discussion section.

 

IAFF 6102 Global Gender Policy

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the development of global policy aimed at achieving gender equality. The course provides an overview of the concept of gender equality, its capture in global policy and approaches to advancing implementation of select thematic areas of gender equality policy at global and country levels. Participants will gain knowledge of the genealogy of the current architecture of global gender equality policy, learn to critique policy approaches taken to advance gender equality and become familiar with the various strategies and tools used to advance implementation of these policies. Discussion of thematic policy areas includes formal economy employment, international security policy, education, health, violence against women, and responses to humanitarian crises.

 

IAFF 6106 Nuclear Weapons

Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall and over two decades after the end of the Cold War, we find ourselves in a world in which nuclear weapons are still with us. Why do we have nuclear weapons? Why do countries seek nuclear weapons and how do they get them? How are nuclear weapons used, both in times of peace and in times of conflict? How is the spread of nuclear weapons controlled? Will we ever live in a world free of nuclear weapons? This course is designed to provide students with a basic orientation to the technologies, policies, and politics to answer these and other questions. We will examine the underlying technologies of the nuclear fuel cycle, production and accounting of nuclear weapons-usable fissile material, and the life cycle of nuclear weapons. We will discuss nuclear strategy and deterrence, particularly in how they relate to nuclear force planning and operations and the prospect of nuclear terrorism. Efforts to control the spread of nuclear weapons through nonproliferation, cooperative threat reduction, nuclear forensics, and counterproliferation are compared in the broader effort to control and reduce nuclear weapons through diplomacy and the means of verifying arms control and reduction agreements. Finally, we consider the prospects for moving to a world free of nuclear weapons.

 

IAFF 6108 International Development Policy

This course examines the scope and nature of international development assistance and the challenges currently facing development agencies. It surveys development theory since Bretton Woods and the Marshall Plan and considers how changes have been reflected in the operational strategies of leading bilateral and multilateral donors. Then the focus of the course will shift to the methods and tools that characterize the work of principal donors, from needs assessment and project design to evaluation. The effectiveness of development assistance will be an important theme of this course, in particular how mixed results have brought methods and concepts into question and how agencies are responding to this challenge.

 

IAFF 6118 Reinventing the United Nations

There is broad agreement that, despite more than twenty years of concerted reform efforts, the United Nations – including the many agencies that comprise what is known as the UN system – is not meeting expectations in areas critical to the management of global affairs. The course seeks to increase participants’ knowledge of the web of international organizations created over the past 70 years for the purpose of managing a widening range of global issues. In addition, the intent is to enable participants to gain a practical understanding of what is required to design competent organizations capable of managing the global challenges of the 21st century. The two principal course projects – the group presentations and the final policy paper – are designed to encourage participants to consider these issues from the perspective of the policymaker and the foreign policy practitioner.

 

IAFF 6118 Leadership & International Affairs

The course will focus on the leadership challenges that Elliott School graduates are certain to confront in their professional lives. The course will begin with a consideration of case studies of famous international leaders, and how concepts of leadership have changed over time. Part II of the course will then move into examining the skill sets required of successful leaders at all levels of career development, drawing on examples and case studies from international settings. Part III of the course will look at the exercise of those skills in different institutional settings, including inside the US government, across diverse cultural boundaries, and in the leading of NGOs, international organizations and key governments. Case studies will also figure prominently. Part IV will look at tomorrow’s challenges for international leaders and includes the development of a personal leadership plan by each student.

 

IAFF 6118 Managing the World’s Water

Water has been at the center of development of societies since the dawn of civilization. Over the millennia humankind has succeeded in utilizing water services to irrigate farmlands, serve large urban centers with convenient services and greening of deserts.  In the past hundred years we have been paying increased attention to the costs of inaction of respecting the water cycle; with pollution, floods and landslides causing hugely expensive losses of life and property in developed and developing countries alike. The course's learning objectives and outcomes include: Learning about water concepts, institutions, and policies; Applying these to understand water management challenges for the resource, services and ecosystem dimensions; And being in a position to take an informed position on the ongoing debates on adaptation challenges of climate change.

 

IAFF 6118 Applied Qualitative Methods

This class introduces students to the main methods of qualitative research: interviewing, taking oral histories, running focus groups, doing surveys, and participant observation. Students will also discuss the ethics of qualitative research, looking at some studies that have been criticized as unethical (the infamous Stanford prison experiment, an undercover study of gay sexual practices, and a deceptive study of undergraduate dorm culture, for example). Students will spend part of the semester conducting their own research projects, which they will present to the class. Students will learn about qualitative research through "how-to" readings, reflective articles by practitioners, guest presentations, and by practicing the techniques we read about. From time to time the instructor will share his own research materials and discuss dilemmas he faced in his research.

 

IAFF 6118 Research Methods in Global Gender Issues

This course surveys mixed research methods with a focus on gender issues in the context of international development. Choosing which methods to use to collect information, and deciding what about gender is most relevant to improve conditions for both men and women as well as to assess development interventions are important elements of planning, policy, and projects. This course explores research techniques pertinent to gender mainstreaming and integration in particular, and international development in general. The objective is to provide an overview of theories and methods relevant to conducting research concerning development projects and programs. The course will encourage an exploration and critical examination of specific research skills and approaches.

 

IAFF 6118 Global Justice

Within the domestic context, we often ask ourselves questions about justice: Is a proposed law fair? What would be a just tax policy? As a citizen, how should I engage in the politics of my country? What values—freedom? equality? democracy?—should our political and social institutions promote or embody? In this class, we will address these kinds of questions as they arise in the global context: What would make the world order just? What principles and values should guide states’ foreign policy? How should individuals and other non-state actors engage in global politics? What do we owe to people in other countries? We will read political theory scholarship on global justice from a variety of different perspectives, and use the ideas therein to analyze real-world political issues such as poverty, humanitarian intervention, the refugee crisis, and globalization. By the end of the term, you will be able to make coherent, informed arguments of your own (both orally and in writing) related to (some of) the major ethical debates surrounding global politics today.

 

IAFF 6118 International Law and the Use of Force

The use of force is one of the major focal points at which international law and politics intersect.  This course provides an overview of various approaches to the legality of war, theories of just war, and humanitarian law, as well as important case studies including humanitarian intervention and emerging issues in cyber-security and automated weapons. Readings will emphasize both the legal and political aspects of the use of force in the contemporary international system. We will examine questions such as: What are the consequences of using force without regard for the legal basis of the decision? Is international law inadequate to reflect the needs of contemporary politics? Is “force” even understood uniformly in the international system? By the end of the course, students should have a good understanding of the difficult issues involved in using force both effectively and legitimately today given the increasing transparency of global politics and the trend towards institutionalized responses.

 

IAFF 6118 International Law

This course will cover the fundamental underpinnings of international law, with a focus on Public International Law, and address specialized topics ranging from environmental law to the law of war. At the end of the course, students should be conversant with the international legal order and have a strong understanding of the law’s applicability to international issues.

 

IAFF 6118 Global Electricity Markets

This course teaches students about the structure and operation of the global electricity markets and regulatory institutions. The class will discuss infrastructure, costs, operation, and environmental aspects of existing power technologies in existing bilateral markets and new electricity markets created by restructuring and privatization efforts in Argentina, the United States, European Union, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. Students will learn about the electric energy, capacity, and ancillary markets and the challenges of integrating renewable into the grid. Topics covered will include cost models for power generation, transmission, and distribution and the rate of return regulation for electric utilities. Students will learn how electricity is priced using locational marginal pricing and about transmission congestion affects prices and how to use financial transmission rights to manage risk in electricity markets. Students will be able to explore regional and country issues by making group presentations and course papers; graduate students are required to do a more comprehensive paper or project.

 

 

 

IAFF 6121 Cornerstone Seminar: IDS

This course is intended for 1st year International Development Studies students only.

 

IAFF 6137 Development Studies Pre-Capstone Workshop

This course is intended for 2nd year International Development Studies students only.

 

IAFF 6138 Humanitarian Governance & Policy

We currently face a growing number of disasters and emergencies around the world and unprecedented levels of humanitarian need exacerbated by dozens of highly violent, protracted conflicts, the COVID-19 pandemic, and climate change. From flash flooding and forest fires to civil wars, these crises cause widespread devastation, migration flows, mass human suffering, and economic disaster. Humanitarian action seeks to save lives, preserve human dignity and minimize suffering resulting from conflict, natural phenomena, and epidemics. 

This course examines humanitarian governance, coordination and policy, focusing on the knowledge and skills required by practitioners to formulate humanitarian policy and coordinate humanitarian response. Humanitarian response is extraordinarily complex and involves many actors, including local groups, governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), such as United Nations agencies, which seek to respond simultaneously to natural disasters (e.g. earthquakes and hurricanes) and/or complex emergencies (e.g. war and other violent conflicts). As such, policymakers and practitioners need to understand the landscape of the humanitarian field, assess mandates and capacities, and analyze the political implications of responses in designing and implementing humanitarian policy.

The course begins by introducing students to the global humanitarian system and providing an overview of the main actors, their roles and mandates; the types and levels of humanitarian crisis; and the main standards, principles and legal frameworks for humanitarian assistance. The course continues by considering key issues in the implementation of humanitarian assistance, including political considerations, diplomacy and early warning systems, and operational challenges such as negotiating access, timely response; funding; coordination and cooperation across scales; and the relationship between humanitarian assistance, peace and development. Students will engage these topics and dilemmas through course lectures and readings; case studies of current humanitarian crises; guest lectures from practitioners working on humanitarian policy and coordination in U.N. agencies, USAID, and NGOs; and applied learning.

 

IAFF 6138 Civil Society & Development

Since the end of the Cold War, academics, international development practitioners, and national policymakers have expended a great amount of energy and resources studying and promulgating the idea and practice of civil society. Civil society, of course, is not a new phenomenon. Religious groups, economic cooperatives and associating for interest or protection stretch back into ancient history. The Enlightenment gave civic organizing a place alongside government in early discussions of democracy and inalienable rights. The end of the Cold War and increased prevalence of international terrorism has ensured that the concept of democracy promotion and support of civil society organizations and activities remains high on both the international development and national security agendas. This course will equip students with theoretical, practical and operational perspectives on the concept of civil society and what it means in the context of international development. By the end of the course, students should be able to broadly define and describe a civil society framework, particularly how it relates to national and international democratic development. They should also be able to evaluate a country’s civil society sector as well as individual civil society organizations (CSOs), identify appropriate interventions and be in a position to evaluate their impact both negatively and positively towards strengthening civic activity and organizations.

 

IAFF 6138 Agriculture & Sustainable Development

What is agriculture’s contribution towards sustainable development and the UN’s Agenda 2030? Our graduate seminar will investigate this question by first examining the Green Revolution and its uneven impact across the developing world. We will then focus on agricultural development policies and projects in Africa, where the majority of the population continues to secure their livelihoods from the agricultural sector. Throughout the course, we will move beyond a singular focus on productivity and competing approaches of agricultural development - e.g. biotechnology and organic agriculture - in order to analyze agriculture’s multiple pathways towards sustainable development. Taking into account consequences from the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change and persistent gender inequality, we will ground our discussions using case studies of existing or planned projects and initiatives, with the ultimate goal of sharpening your skill sets to contribute towards sustainable agricultural development from the household to the policy levels. The course includes the opportunity to work with both the United Nations Foundation as well as the International Institute of Sustainable Development. We will also take advantage of the outdoors as much as possible.

 

IAFF 6138 Human Trafficking

This course will examine the global problem of human trafficking, a complex socio-economic, political, human rights, and law enforcement issue that affects individuals and communities in nearly all countries of the world. Countries can be an origin, transit, and/or destination for trafficked and exploited individuals. Vulnerabilities such as statelessness, poverty, the lack of economic opportunities, globalization, weak national laws and policies, displacement, strict migration policies, corruption, gender-based violence, and discrimination – among others – create conditions that allow traffickers/exploiters to take advantage of individuals and keep them in situations of forced labor and/or commercial sexual exploitation. Combating human trafficking requires a wide spectrum of activities usually referred to as the “4 Ps” – prevention, protection, prosecution, and partnership, along with “4 Rs” – rescue, raid, rehabilitation, and reintegration.

 

IAFF 6138 Monitoring & Evaluation for Foreign Assistance Programs

Increasing focus continues to be placed on effective, rigorous monitoring and evaluation of U.S. foreign assistance efforts. Implementers of foreign assistance programs are required to identify robust and refined criteria to monitor and evaluate their work, with overall efforts under increasing scrutiny by policymakers. However, there is still a vibrant discussion on how best to monitor and evaluate many aspects of foreign assistance work, and the field of monitoring and evaluation is currently being shaped by debates over research design, methodology, and use. This course will explore the basic concepts and theories behind monitoring and evaluation and the tools/techniques used for measuring assistance programs. Throughout the course, we will explore various thematic questions: How can change be measured in complex systems? How should indicators of change be selected? How can evaluators strike a balance between learning and accountability? What makes for valid evaluation design, and are randomized control trials the ‘gold standard’ of foreign assistance evaluation? Can causality be isolated? How can evaluation findings be used?

 

IAFF 6138 Anti-Corruption Strategies in International Development

Corruption may be the biggest business in the world today, involving as much as $3 trillion/year, or 5% of the total global economy. Much of this vast amount of money is - directly or indirectly - extracted from developing countries. Instead of being used to improve health care and education, build roads, provide security or meet other keenly-felt needs, it enriches predatory domestic elites, and enables the continuing rise of repressive authoritarian regimes. In this class students will learn about the range of efforts by states, multilateral organizations, civil society and bilateral donors to curb and counteract corruption, with the goal of assessing which approaches and strategies are and are not working, and proposing ways to make them more effective. To do this, readings and lectures will cover both theoretical issues and the practical aspects of designing, implementing and managing anti-corruption programs, and will draw on an eclectic mix of sources including academic literature, implementer reports and first-hand accounts of how corruption is experienced in developing countries. Students will make in-class presentations on the readings and can expect that about half the class sessions will feature a guest speaker sharing his or her experiences working on this issue.

 

IAFF 6138 Gender and Development

This graduate-level seminar will begin by examining the evolution of theoretical approaches regarding gender and development and the debates that have emerged over how to promote gender equity and rights across the gender spectrum. We will then consider some of the key issues in the field of gender and development and the challenges and successes that development practitioners have experienced in addressing gender inequalities. Throughout the course, we will seek to identify general patterns and lessons with broader applications as well as to recognize differences within and between societies. We will use a combination of academic sources, international development reports, and other materials produced by development practitioners to ground our discussions and study how organizations have sought to implement gender-sensitive approaches to development. The assignments are practical and relevant to professional work in the field of gender and development.

 

IAFF 6138 Bottom-Up Development

From William Easterly to Dambisa Moyo, and from Jeffrey sachs to Paul Collier, development thinkers have expressed both considerable frustration with policies, programs, strategies and institutions charged with alleviating poverty, as well as the need to focus additional resources on or reformed actions toward populations at the ‘bottom.’ Despite the analyses and fretting, and resultant actions, hundreds of millions, if not more than a billion, of the earth’s population remains tragically poor, somehow managing to survive on $2.00 a day or less. This graduate seminar takes these analyses, frustrations and unsatisfactory results as a starting point to delve into prospects for more effective poverty alleviation through the application of ‘bottom-up’ approaches. After briefly examining failings of foreign aid from both grassroots and top-down perspectives, the focus turns to bottom-up approaches, casting an eye on evolutionary aspects, critical components, and current applications. Subsequently, attention is placed on how poor people manage to survive, and in some cases get ahead, with few resources, before turning to an examination of several increasingly noted mechanisms responding to poor people’s needs for assistance to improve their economic standing. The seminar closes with consideration of the pros and cons of these mechanisms and approaches, and their prospects for achieving poverty alleviation from the bottom-up.

 

 

IAFF 6138 Strategic Environmental Management

While many in the business, government, and non-profit sectors view environmental protection as a threat to competitiveness, others see win-win opportunities. This course provides students with graduate level knowledge and real life case examples that will allow them to design profitable corporate environmental management strategies. After taking this course, students will be able to:1. Formulate profitable corporate environmental management strategies. 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of green differentiation advantage strategies.3. Explain how corporate environmental strategies are affected by: stakeholder pressures, distinctive country contexts, and variations in business-level characteristics. And 4. Explain the opportunities/challenges of climate change trends for businesses.

 

IAFF 6141 International Science and Technology Policy Cornerstone

This graduate-level seminar will begin by examining the evolution of theoretical approaches regarding gender and development and the debates that have emerged over how to promote gender equity and rights across the gender spectrum. We will then consider some of the key issues in the field of gender and development and the challenges and successes that development practitioners have experienced in addressing gender inequalities. Throughout the course, we will seek to identify general patterns and lessons with broader applications as well as to recognize differences within and between societies. We will use a combination of academic sources, international development reports, and other materials produced by development practitioners to ground our discussions and study how organizations have sought to implement gender-sensitive approaches to development. The assignments are practical and relevant to professional work in the field of gender and development.

Registration is restricted to graduate students only. Undergraduates may enroll only with permission of the instructor.

 

IAFF 6145 US Space Policy

U.S. Space Policy - This course will address international space policy issues facing the United States and place them in context with broader technological advances and the changing strategic environment. The course will address current bureaucratic and regulatory issues facing U.S. space programs with regard to dual-use technologies, including export controls, spectrum management, and licensing of commercial remote sensing systems. Conflicts over dual-use technologies, such as space launch, remote sensing, satellite navigation, and communications, will be examined for their implications for a range of national interests. The course will also address strategic choices facing other nations in space activities, including dependence on U.S., European, and Russian space capabilities, developing indigenous space programs, and use of commercial space capabilities.

 

IAFF 6148 Space and National Security

Space and National Security - A broad, complex, and multidimensional set of factors contribute to the ability of states to use science and technology to advance their national security.  This course examines how effectively states, and the United States, in particular, develop policies designed to translate science and technology into a strategic advantage.  To assess this issue the course addresses a range of factors including innovation, revolutions in military affairs, globalization and international economic integration, technology transfer and export controls, changing global security dynamics, and the impact of emerging technologies on defense industries and military power.  Major themes addressed throughout the course would form parts of an integrative framework for understanding the interplay between science, technology, and national security policy.

 

IAFF 6152 Energy Policy

This course focuses on the patterns of international energy policy-making and implementation, energy geopolitics, and the emergence of environmental and institutional challenges that will fundamentally reshape the way global society extracts and consumes energy. It is organized around historical patterns, current issues, and future prospects. An integrating theme is the role played by science and technology.

 

IAFF 6158 Artificial Intelligence and Non-Proliferation

The objective of this class is to explicate the mechanisms underlying the non-proliferation framework created in the aftermath of World War II and assess whether those mechanisms would work if similar non-proliferation frameworks were created to deal with emerging technologies including artificial intelligence and human genome editing. During the first third of the semester, the class will review the mechanisms underlying the nuclear, chemical and biological non-proliferation frameworks, including elements such as treaties, inspections to assure peaceful use of technologies, export control regimes, and norm construction.  The second third of the class will examine relevant international relations theories, like offense dominance, and characteristics of select emerging technologies (fiscal and technological entry costs; extent of global diffusion; extent of dual use between civilian and military purposes).  The final third of the class will assess the extent to which elements of non-proliferation frameworks would be effective in mitigating the ill effects of specific emerging technologies.  Each student will develop a paper recommending for or against the U.S. government pursuing the creation of an element of the non-proliferation framework for one of the emerging technologies studied in the class.

 

IAFF 6158 Economics of Technological Change

This course provides an overview of important issues related to technological change that have attracted the attention of economists up to the present time. Among all social sciences, economics may be argued to have taken the longest and broadest interest in technological advancement and innovation. Examples of topics discussed include: technology markets, Schumpeterian hypotheses, market concentration and firm size as factors of technological innovation, expenditures in research and development, private and social returns to R&D, technological change and industry entry/exit, intellectual property rights, measurement of technology and innovation, Industry 4.0, Internet of Things, innovation in service sectors.

 

IAFF 6161 International Security

Survey of the field of international security studies; overview of key concepts, theories, and approaches; inter-state, intra-state, and transnational security problems and the interrelated nature of these categories; analysis of security topics such as great-power relations, arms racing and arms control, crisis management, civil wars, terrorism, and gender, combined with a review of regional developments; non-military issues that have major security implications, including poverty, health, population movements, energy consumption, and climate change; the role of international organizations in promoting international security, and prospects for the future. **There are discussion sections linked to this lecture, please register for one.

Registration is restricted to Security Policy Studies graduate students only. Also register for a discussion section.

 

IAFF 6163 Transnational Security

Transnational Security - This course focuses on transnational security issues and considers how many of these myriad challenges constitute threats to global peace and security. The combined effects of such transnational security issues as drug, weapons, and human trafficking, piracy, acts of terrorism, infectious diseases, and deliberate environmental destruction, along with such critical enablers as corruption, and money movements are not strangers on the world stage. What is new is their global reach and destructive potential. As a result, these issues have made policymakers consider different conceptions of security and, at times, to move beyond sole considerations of state sovereignty into the realm of human security.

 

IAFF 6164 Environmental Security

Environmental Security - Taking globalization and the continuing Global War on Terror into account, transnational concepts, including environmental change, have led to re-interpretations of security studies. However, the precise scope and meaning of the resulting environmental security field has been the subject of debate among policymakers and scholars. Through readings and seminar discussions, this course explores how the environment influences various aspects of security, including the relationship between conflict, environmental degradation, and natural resources. Using multidisciplinary academic literature, and policy-focused reports, the course begins with an analysis of theoretical security concepts and moves to a survey of major “drivers” of environmental security including: demographics; climate change; energy and natural resources; and water. Finally, students consider scenarios of how environmental security can be integrated into U.S. defense and foreign policy decisions in the coming decades.

 

IAFF 6165 Fundamentals of Intelligence

This graduate-level seminar will discuss the basics of intelligence collection, production, and analysis and provide an introduction to the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), the authorities under which the IC operates, its role in informing U.S. national security and foreign policy, its role in implementing policy decisions, and the formation of policy and laws that guide the IC. The class will examine the IC in the context of historical, current, and expected future scenarios, and will discuss historic and potential future changes in how the IC informs and implements policy, as well as how oversight is conducted. In particular, the class will discuss the expanded role of the IC, both analytically and operationally, in the post-9/11 world, as well as the impact of the Wikileaks, Snowden, and other unauthorized disclosures in recent years.

 

IAFF 6171 Introduction to Conflict Resolution

In all human societies, conflict is an integral part of daily life, at personal, communal, national and global levels. Conflict can be constructive, focusing attention on neglected voices or social injustice, and driving cultural and political change. It can also be destructive, damaging relationships, polarizing societies or escalating into violence and war. This course is designed to familiarize students with the interdisciplinary field of conflict analysis and resolution, providing an overview of core concepts of contemporary theory and practice. The course will examine frameworks for analyzing the origins and processes of social conflict, and leading practical approaches to the conduct and evaluation of conflict resolution interventions. Our study will focus on intergroup and international levels of analysis, highlighting collective struggles over ideology and power, sovereignty, and self-determination, while highlighting the roles of culture, identity, power, relational dynamics and social structure. The first half of the course emphasizes conflict analysis; the second half emphasizes approaches to conflict resolution.

 

IAFF 6173 Security and Development

This course aims to consider the relationship between security and development across a number of issue areas. Its objective is to enable you to create your own ‘map’ of the relationship and help you to understand some of the connections and disconnections between the two fields.  The course will also allow you to deepen your understanding of one developing country and to demonstrate that knowledge through a range of products. The existence of this course reflects the fact that there is growing interest from the security field in issues that have traditionally been the purview of development. This seminar course looks at armed conflict and failed states, but it seeks to look beyond these issues as well to areas such as demography, the environment, urbanization, and trade, to see how the development-security relationship looks in these issue areas.

 

IAFF 6186 United States National Security

This course examines the problems and issues confronting American national security policymakers using a combination of empirical information and conceptual analysis. The course content includes conceptual definitions of national security, policymaking processes and debates, national security institutions and organizations, relationships between foreign, economic and defense policy, and civil-military relations. The course presumes familiarity with American politics and U.S. history and encourages students to keep up on relevant world events by reading legitimate news sources. At the end of the semester, students should be able to critically engage, understand, articulate and explain ideas and arguments about the U.S. national security process and the complexity of American strategic interests and decision-making processes.

 

IAFF 6186 Great Power Competition

This course will examine the past, present, and future of how the most powerful states in the international system—the great powers—compete and cooperate in international relations. It will introduce different ways of defining and measuring relative power, and will cover the key theoretical models of great power competition. It will then examine various facets of great power competition, including its relationship to geography, technology, economics, global governance, ideology, and the global “periphery.” The course will also examine the foreign and national security policies of individual great powers in detail, including those of the United States, the People’s Republic of China, the Russian Federation, and a number of near- or potential-great powers, such as India and the European Union. Through this course, students will gain a thorough understanding of how the great powers protect their security and pursue their interests in international politics.

 

IAFF 6186 Cyberspace, Conflict, and War

This course will examine the relationship between cyber technology, conflict, and war. After introducing key concepts regarding cyber technology, strategy, and policy, the course will examine the relationship between information technology and various aspects of domestic and international conflict and war. These include offense and defense, deterrence and compellence, popular uprisings and repression, civil conflict, propaganda, espionage, conventional military operations, and nuclear war, among others. These various aspects of cyberspace and conflict will be highlighted through in-depth examinations of crucial contemporary case studies. Through this course, students will gain a thorough understanding of how the emergence of cyber technology is and will continue to shape domestic and international conflict.

 

IAFF 6186 Coercion in Peace and War

In the 21st century, governments can use a variety of tools to compel and deter each other, from economic sanctions to nuclear weapons. Decision-makers frequently combine these tools to try to change the behavior of states and other international actors, employing what is often called a “whole-of-government” or “cross-domain” approach to coercion. In this course, students will learn to think systematically about how these tools can be combined to produce more effective foreign policy outcomes in peace and war. Using key theories of coercion, and examples from contemporary international relations, we will assess the similarities and differences, and past successes and failures of the following coercive tools: economic sanctions, political influence operations, sanctions in international organizations, cyberattacks, proxies, conventional military power, and nuclear weapons. We will also examine how policy-makers select which tool(s) to use in a specific situation, how to integrate plans to use different tools, and why policy-makers may fail to integrate planning, leading to unintended, negative foreign policy outcomes. 

 

IAFF 6186 Russia and International Security

This course examines how Russia’s security apparatus executes disinformation campaigns, political sabotage, election disruption, government subterfuge, artificial intelligence “bots” in social media, computational propaganda, and new technologies to dominate conventional battlefields. Other topics include: Pre-Soviet and Soviet military history; Russian foreign policy and grand strategy; NATO enlargement; the Ukraine/Crimean crisis and aftermath, energy security; cyber warfare and espionage; status of new Russian defense systems and military capabilities; post-Soviet States’ security and Eurasian conflicts; nuclear strategy, arms control, and missile defense; and whether the US, Russia, and China are enemies, allies, or rivals.

 

IAFF 6186 Emerging Threats

This course surveys emerging risks and challenges that threaten human, national and global security. It does so by paying special attention to a range of military and non-military issues where science and technology play a major role. Topics covered include how to think about the concepts of risk and securitization; revolutions in military affairs and hybrid warfare; the challenges of nuclear security and terrorism; conflict in cyberspace; the uses and consequences of robotics, drones and autonomous weapons systems; military developments in biotechnology; artificial intelligence; as well as non-military issues related to demography, urbanization, public health, the environment, and outer space. For each issue, the course examines the politics of scientific and technological evolution by identifying the key drivers of change; the nature of threats at the local, national, and global levels; and how existing security policies should be reformed in response. A technical background is not required but will enhance one’s understanding.

 

IAFF 6186 International Organized Crime

International Organized Crime is a graduate-level seminar, focused on developing broad critical skills and knowledge around IOC and the aspects and issues that intersect with the topic. Transnational crime will be a defining issue of the 21st century for policymakers – as defining as the Cold War was for the 20thcentury and colonialism was for the 19th. This course will involve extensive reading, research, and writing. It will also involve vigorous group discussion on the assigned readings/topic. Certain portions of what we will discuss and encounter are rich enough to warrant a dedicated course – such as illicit trafficking, money laundering, or corruption. We will examine a variety of international organized criminal groups and their illicit activities. This survey will provide a solid basis for further, more in-depth study of these attributes, functions, and entities. It will consist of academic writings, broad overview lectures, specific student presentations and contemporary readings of the issues we are studying.

 

IAFF 6186 Stabilization and Peacebuilding

The classic interstate conflicts of the past have been largely replaced by intra-state and regional conflicts involving both state and non-state actors. States and regions beset by political and economic instability provide fertile ground for nationalist, sectarian and ethnic conflict, and terrorism and organized criminal activities. In addition, the inability of many of these fragile and weak states to confront natural and man-made disasters, the effects of climate change, pandemic disease and worldwide economic shocks adds further stresses that can exacerbate conflict. This course will examine the lessons from these missions covering general principles and approaches that can be applied for stabilization and peacebuilding, required resources, the structures that have been organized to mount such operations, the gaps that remain, and the knowledge and skills the new peacebuilder needs to operate in these environments.

IAFF 6186 Cyber Threats, Policy, and Strategy

This course examines current issues in the realm of cybersecurity, focusing on cybersecurity strategy, threats, conflict, and policy. It begins with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and considers the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through case studies, it examines previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. Students will analyze the roles of several different types of actors in cyber security including states, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups, and private sector responses. This course will also analyze cyber deterrence and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. Technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

 

IAFF 6186 NATO’s Strategic Challenges

In partnership with NATO’s Allied Command Transformation (in Norfolk, VA), this class will explore the strategic environment that confronts NATO today. This includes the Trump administration’s wavering commitment to collective defense; intra-Alliance political and strategic tensions; potential “contamination” of Alliance dynamics by tensions affecting other fields such as transatlantic trade relations; the Allies’ uneven efforts to improve their defense budgets and capabilities; security challenges in Ukraine, MENA and the Arctic in the context of Russia’s strategic reassertion; NATO’s institutional reform; the transition away from Afghanistan; the strategic impact of Brexit; and the rise of the grand-strategic saliency of East Asia. Our class will combine conventional lectures with seminar discussions, field visits, and mentorship with practitioners.

 

IAFF 6186 The Chinese Military

This course focuses on the military component of China's comprehensive national power, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA). We begin with an overview of Chinese national security objectives, the role of military forces   in securing those objectives, the missions Chinese leaders assign the PLA, and the military operational capabilities Chinese leaders view as necessary to accomplish those missions. Next we take a quick tour of the history of the PLA, with emphasis on the decades since the start of China’s reform era in 1979 and the ongoing effort to generate military capabilities commensurate with China’s ambitions as a rising global power. We then examine the PLA in more detail, including organization, force structure, operational capabilities, specific missions, modernization objectives, the PLA’s role in national security policy-making, and relations between military officers and civilian authorities. We will take a brief look at the other components of China’s armed forces and security services, and close with an examination of alternative futures for Chinese military power.

 

IAFF 6186 Political Violence and Terrorism

This course examines the origins, strategies, and types of terrorism and political violence. It is divided into sections on different types of terrorism from religiously motivated political violence to right-wing terrorist activity. Students will learn about the strategies used by these groups, including through case studies of individual terrorist groups. Additionally, it will examine several special topics as “lone wolf” and suicide terrorists.

 

IAFF 6186 Civil-Military Relations

The study of civil-military relations examines the relationship and interaction of the government, military and the citizenry – all of whom are crucial players in the shaping of national security policy. However, each of these institutions has its own priorities, values and purposes, yet they all must find ways to cooperate in order to protect the country’s interests, both domestically and abroad.  Moreover, each carries its own unique source of power which demands a careful balancing at the risk of subverting one of the others.  This course will examine a broad range of topics regarding civil military relations to include civil-military theory, practice (both in western and non-western societies) and various socio-political issues that influence civil-military relations in the 21stcentury (mass media, contractors and the “civ-mil gap”).  The course will also explore recent case studies (Iraq and Afghanistan) to analyze how all the major players in the civil-military relations dynamic have functioned in two major applications of military force.  Overall, this course will help inform the statesman, professional military officer and citizen in creating a better understanding of his/her role in relation to their government and society in the policy making process.

 

IAFF 6186 Understanding United States Special Operations

This seminar is designed as a graduate course to examine the use of U.S. Special Operations Forces in support of a broad range of national security objectives. Taught by a former Special Operations officer, the course explores both historical and contemporary debates over the use of Special Operations Forces. Although primarily focused upon U.S. Special Operations from World War II to the present, the course will also briefly delve into how special operations forces have been used by other countries throughout history.  Questions and topics to be discussed include: what are special operations; what are the different types of U.S. Special Operations Forces; what are the different roles and missions of each force element; how have Special Operations historically been used; how will Special Operations be used in the future; and what organizational and cultural challenges face the future force.  These topics are introduced to students using multiple heuristic tools, including lectures, discussions, case studies, policy debates, and guest speakers.

 

IAFF 6186 Early Warning and Conflict Prevention

It has long been a truism that prevention is better than cure. Support for the prevention of large-scale violent conflicts blossomed after the end of the Cold War and has grown with the recognition of the increasing interconnectedness of many contemporary threats. Yet, finding reliable strategies for conflict prevention has proven uniquely challenging. This course will address major policy and academic issues in conflict early warning and prevention. Readings will include academic literature, NGO and think tank reports, and official policy documents. Most classes will include discussion of a historical or contemporary case study, a guest speaker, and/or a practical exercise.

 

IAFF 6186 Civil Wars in World Politics

This course examines the interplay between contemporary civil wars and world politics, exploring the causes and consequences of these interactions. Students will apply concepts from international relations theory to analyze key questions concerning civil wars. For example, when do civil wars begin? How are they fought? Who intervenes in civil wars? Why do civil wars last so long? What are the consequences for international peace and stability? The objective of this course is to acquire the tools and techniques to critically analyze these conflicts and to understand the different foreign policy challenges they entail.

 

IAFF 6186 US Grand Strategy

This course examines U.S. grand strategy, meaning the politico-military continuum of means and ends that the state employs to achieve security. The course first analyzes the concept of grand strategy: what it means, how it’s achieved and when it fails. The course then turns to causes of grand strategy—the international conditions, technological developments, geographic circumstances, domestic actors and ideological beliefs that shape strategic options. Finally, to make these concepts more concrete, the course examines U.S. grand strategy at two pivotal points in recent U.S. history: the early Cold War, when the United States introduced nuclear missiles into the military, and today.

 

IAFF 6186 Heroes and Villains in the Global Arena

Close study of individual world leaders provides one of the many entries into understanding world events.   Fascinating and complex, word leaders have engaged the imagination of scholars and practitioners across disciplines and throughout history.  This course will focus on understanding the psychology of leaders, how they both react to and shape their contexts, the myths and narratives that develop around them, and how formal assessment of individual leaders has been used historically in industry, diplomacy, and national security contexts. Using historical case studies of both famous and infamous world leaders, the course focuses on assessing the person of the leader:  background and personality, health, behavior, and relationships with his or her inner circle.  The course also surveys important elements of a leader’s interplay with his or her cultural, social and political context, including large-group dynamics with followers, how leaders relate to each other, and the shifting myths,  fantasies and narratives  that develop around these larger-than-life personalities.  The course also addresses the utility, common pitfalls, and ethics of developing formal leader assessments.

 

IAFF 6186 Cybersecurity

This course will focus on the transnational impact of non-state actors on international policy and security. We will analyze different types of actors, from transnational criminal organizations to NGOs to terrorist groups primarily through case studies. Students will consider the interaction of non-state actors with state actors, evaluating impacts on sovereignty and governance worldwide.

 

IAFF 6186 Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

This course provides students with an introduction to the nature of insurgency, some key historical examples of how insurgencies were defeated, and analytical frameworks and tools for understanding and countering insurgencies. It is intended to provide a solid foundation for further inquiry into related topics such as irregular warfare, security and development, stabilization and peacebuilding, responses to terrorism, and conflict resolution. The course examines the multi-disciplinary nature of insurgencies, and introduces students to the major concepts and issues of the topic, explores the main types of insurgencies, and analyzes in depth a number of strategic cases of counterinsurgency to help students understand the complexity and the variety of this form of warfare in the modern world. The course provides key frameworks for analysis for the study of insurgency and explores possible solutions to a number of current conflicts. 

 

IAFF 6186 Transitional Justice

Since the end of the Cold War, peace building interventions have increasingly implemented Transitional Justice (TJ) initiatives. TJ incorporates a dynamic set of multidisciplinary mechanisms adapted to societies transforming themselves after a period of pervasive human rights abuses due to conflict or authoritarian Regimes. While definitions of TJ may vary, they all encompass the political, legal and moral dilemmas about how to deal with historic human rights violations and political violence in societies undergoing some form of political Transition. The field has expanded in three significant ways: it has moved to embrace a larger number of disciplines, transcending its initial legal focus; it has broadened its goals; and it has also raised high expectations in troubled societies. Even though TJ cannot achieve all of its goals, due to its inherent limitations, this fascinating and increasingly popular field merits its careful study. The purpose of this course is to: (i) examine and analyze TJ mechanisms including trials, truth commissions,

reparations, lustration/vetting, amnesties and memorialization; (ii) investigate normative and political debates raised by TJ processes; (iii) assess the effects and reach of TJ processes; and (iv) discuss real examples stemming from a variety of countries that have experienced huge violations of human rights (v) Develop a critical understanding of the potential and limitations of the field.

 

IAFF 6193 Corporate Finance

This course explores the sources of managerial information that are provided by money and capital markets, primary and secondary markets, and cash and futures markets; Money and capital market instruments, relevant return measures, risk metrics for bonds and equities. Theory, policy, and practice of financial management are examined through the elements of financial analysis, sources of funds, investing, capital planning and budgeting, dividend policy, and working capital management.

 

IAFF 6208 Public Diplomacy

This course examines the expanding public dimension of modern diplomacy. It builds on global interest in public diplomacy in the 21st century’s diplomatic environment. We will explore how diplomats and political leaders communicate in a world of rapid globalization, new diplomatic actors, complex policy issues, digital technologies, increased risk, and uncertain boundaries between foreign and domestic. This seminar is designed to help public diplomacy concentrators deepen their knowledge and serve the interdisciplinary interests of students in global communication, international relations, and media studies.

 

IAFF 6212 Strategy and Leadership

Leaders in government, the private sector, and the non-profit sector must be able to develop a compelling strategy that is understood by managers and employers.  They will be most successful if they can articulate a vision for staff and clients to embrace. The goal of this course is to provide you with some knowledge and tools to devise and implement your own smart visions and strategies at any level.  The basis is how leaders determine their vision and then communicate and execute the vision, using their leadership skills.

Registration is restricted to MIPP students only.

 

IAFF 6213 Leadership Capstone

This course is intended for MIPP students only.

 

IAFF 6216 Economic Tools for Global Policy

In this course, MIPP Online students will analyze economic issues and concrete economic policy problems. This course examines questions such as: How does economic policy affect technology and immigration - and vice versa? What are the implications of various trade policies on the global economy? How has globalization and rapid spread of high-tech communication influenced the US economy?

 

IAFF 6222 U.S. Foreign Policy

This course examines the practice and theory of U.S. foreign policy. Students begin by analyzing the institutions and processes used by the U.S. Government to formulate and implement foreign policy. The course then presents an overview of U.S. foreign policy decisions, from post-independence, to the Cold War, post-Cold War, War on Terror, and the post-primacy era of Presidents Obama and Trump. As students move through U.S. foreign policy history, they examine specific case studies as well as theoretical underpinnings including exceptionalism, realism, and liberalism. Finally, students analyze and debate the future of U.S. global leadership as well as articulate a vision for how the U.S. can engage effectively in Great Power Competition.

 

IAFF 6318 Korea-Japan Relations

 How does the past shape contemporary geopolitics? Why do Korea and Japan seem to hate each other? Why did Kim Jong-un ride a white horse up a mountain twice last year? This course uses Korea and its turbulent history to understand political tensions in East Asia today. We will use ancient mythology to predict what North Korea will do next, understand why Korea was the setting for almost all the great wars in East Asia, and explore the legacies of Japanese colonialism in today’s politics.

 

IAFF 6318 Women in Asia

This course examines the social, cultural, political, and economic roles of women in Asia in a comparative context, both in terms of historical development (from the mid-19th century to the present) and within different Asian societies. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the class will investigate the place of women in the family and in society, their relationships with one another and with men, and their relationship to politics and the state. Emphasis will be placed on China, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea, but other countries in Southeast and South Asia will also be examined.

 

IAFF 6318 Taiwan Through The Lens of History, Identity, and Film

The course will examine 20th and 21st century history and identity politics in Taiwan through the film arts, including but not limited to works by Taiwanese directors such as Li Hsing, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Edward Yang, Zero Chou, and Chung Mong-hong. After completing the course, students will be able to identify and discuss Taiwanese culture in a geopolitical context.

 

IAFF 6321 Colloquium: Europe and Eurasia

This course provides a survey of current research on Europe and Eurasia.

 

 

IAFF 6338 The European Union

This course examines the history and development of postwar European integration; the structure and processes of the European Union; and EU and national policies, with a focus on the interaction of the EU and the Member States. It is a seminar, though there will be lectures as well. In addition to imparting knowledge about the EU, the course aims to improve analytical, writing and presentational skills through the preparation of a 25-page research paper, brief written assignments, a simulation exercise and an oral briefing. By following instructions and carrying out the assignments successfully, students should be able to analyze institutional, political, economic and social dynamics of the EU and Member States, critically evaluate the literature on these topics, formulate policy recommendations, utilize hypothesis-testing guidelines, conduct research systematically and write clearly.

 

IAFF 6338 The Far-Right in Europe, Eurasia, and the U.S.

This course introduces students to the history and contemporary rise of the far right in the “broader West,” with a focus on Europe, the US, and Russia-Eurasia. After looking at the transformation and progressive resurgence of the far right following World War II, the class will turn its attention to current theories, movements, and leaders—from the American Alt-Right to the European Identitarians and Russian figures such as Alexander Dugin, as well as active transnational networks. The class will help students understand how the far right has been able to introduce its concepts and views—nativism, conspiracy theories, etc.—to a broad audience, producing a spectrum that runs from populist and illiberal leaders in power to extreme threats of domestic terrorism. Students will develop critical thinking skills by reading social science articles that combine political philosophy, political science, sociology of gender and race, and cultural anthropology of media and radical subcultures. 

 

IAFF 6338 Politics of Post-Soviet Eurasia

This course is a seminar on comparative politics and state building in the non-Russian successor states of the USSR – a region often referred to as post-Soviet Eurasia. The course is structured both by topic, and by subregion, and addresses the following issues: the concept of political “transition”; historical legacies and the construction of political institutions; democracy, authoritarianism, and hybrid regimes; informal practices; popular mobilization; economic foundations of power; and the “new” post-Soviet politics. The course is not a comprehensive survey of politics in the region, although it includes case studies of political developments in several states (including Ukraine, Georgia, Belarus, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and others). Readings have been selected on the basis of a combination of empirical research and comparative value, as well as the extent to which they are in dialogue with each other.

 

IAFF 6338 US-Russia Relations in the 21st Century

The purpose of this course is to provide both graduate and undergraduate students with a careful analytical and empirical understanding of the evolution of U.S. - Russia relations in the new millennium. The course will define the principal drivers of bilateral interaction in an international context and debate the possible future scenarios of those relations. It will examine the domestic sources of Russian foreign policy (including energy, climate change and the Arctic), the reasons for Russia and the West being in strategic competition, the differences in American and Russian approaches toward former Soviet republics, Eastern and Western Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and China. The course will offer a brief review of key thematic points in U.S. and Russian international agendas during the 90’s, in order to clarify problems that led to the end of the post-Cold War period and the beginning of the Putin era. We will explore Russia’s evolving role in more recent global developments, including populist and anti-establishment politics, and evaluate how far Russia has moved to set up a multipolar world order. The course will consider if the West is now engaged in a new Cold War with Russia, and discuss the impact of economic sanctions as well as ”Russiagate” investigations on bilateral relations. Upon completion of the course, a student should understand the most important issues in U.S. - Russia relations, be able to identify potential areas of cooperation, along with the challenges and contradictions of U.S. and Russia policies in various regions of the world. Assigned readings will familiarize students with the critical debates among academics, researchers and policymakers who focus on US-Russian relations.

 

IAFF 6338 Nationalism & Nation-Building

This is a class on the causes and the political effects of nationalism in Europe. The first half of the course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the most prominent explanations of the emergence of nationalism, and the background knowledge and tools with which to evaluate them. We will study the transition from Empires to nation-states. In the second half of the course, we will focus on the effects of nationalism on domestic politics, political identities, patterns of political violence as well as voting, and state policies toward minorities, diasporas, and immigrants. We are going to cover cases across Europe and from different time periods. Students will learn how to formulate research questions, develop arguments, and evaluate hypotheses.

 

IAFF 6338 The Holocaust in Eastern Europe

Of the approximately six million Jews who perished during the Holocaust, more than two-thirds were citizens of Poland and the Soviet Union. The next largest groups of Jewish victims came from Romania, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia. Eastern Europe was the epicenter for Hitler’s“Final Solution,” but due to lack of survivors, limited access to documentation, and Cold War politics, the genocide of Jews in these regions remains understudied and misunderstood. This course capitalizes on a relatively recent explosion in scholarship to provide students with in-depth knowledge of how the Holocaust unfolded in the East. Through thematic explorations, a series of case studies, and critical interrogation of primary sources and their postwar afterlives, we will examine how the Holocaust differed between Eastern and Western Europe, how persecution of Jews varied within Eastern Europe, and why, due to divergent legacies and memory politics, these histories remain contested even well into the 21st century.

 

IAFF 6341 Latin American & Hemispheric Studies Program Cornerstone

This course is intended for LAHSP students only.

 

IAFF 6357 Latin American & Hemispheric Studies Pre-Capstone Workshop

This course is intended for LAHSP students only.

 

IAFF 6358 Latin in Motion: Indigeonous Media & Social Movements

Cinema and documentary film have played an important role in shaping politics, social movements and public spheres in Latin America since the 1960s. The arrival of indigenous filmmakers and the narratives they author has built on these foundations, adding complexities in position, substance and style that we will unpack in this course. Embracing a hemispheric, las Américas perspective, this course will look broadly at production models and aesthetic and political debates that have informed Latin American (and to some extent [email protected]) film and media practices since the mid-twentieth century as well as the some of the social movements that underwrite them. Our consideration of these topics will be accompanied by screening of relevant film, video, and television productions and geographic areas of emphasis include Mexico, Cuba, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina.

 

IAFF 6358 Government and Politics in Latin America

Populism has gone global and, while it continues to be a recurring phenomenon throughout Latin America, it currently seems to be waning in the region.  Globalization, neo-liberalism, and democratization, while improving conditions in many countries, have been less successful in others or failed to meet rising expectations for progress. That left an opening for populism to emerge since the turn of the millennium. This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of populism, the rich theoretical debates surrounding the concept, as well as classical and contemporary empirical manifestations of the phenomenon. Students should be prepared to engage social theory as well as historical and contemporary case study analyses.

 

IAFF 6358 Immigration and Weak States

This course will look at the factors that give rise to weak states close to the US border, the resulting migration trends, options for improving these societies, and the policy tools that the United States has at its disposal to mitigate push factors. A thorough examination of Central America’s Northern Triangle will then provide the basis for a comparative look at the reasons behind and responses to migratory outflows from Cuba and present-day Venezuela. Students will analyze present-day economic, security and governance challenges and think through realistic policy options.

 

IAFF 6358 Democracy Under Siege in Latin America  

Is democracy under siege again? Support for democracy is at its lowest level since surveys began some thirty years ago. Public disenchantment is widespread. The blue tide reached Brazil and Chile but the pink one returned to Argentina and landed in Mexico in a seemingly unending political volatility.  The crises in Peru, Ecuador, Chile, Honduras and Guatemala lead observers to fear a third “counter-wave” to democracy. Authoritarian regimes remain entrenched in Venezuela and Nicaragua. Furthermore, the insertion of the region in the world has changed dramatically. China especially, but Russia too, are playing roles unseen before. The geo-economics-thus-geopolitics paradigm seems to be reversing back to the geopolitics-thus-geo economics.   What exactly and  is happening and why? What does it all mean? What are the implications for the region and the world? This class will enable students to develop a theoretically informed understanding of this reality and the factors that explain it as well as to foresee the likely trends for the future. 

 

 

IAFF 6358 Climate Change & Environmental Policy in Latin America

Latin America is endowed with significant natural resources and environmental assets, including almost one third of the world's fresh water, the largest rainforest on earth, a quarter of proven oil and natural gas reserves and among the world's highest potential for renewable energy sources, such as hydropower, wind and solar energy. However, Latin American countries are also some of the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, including hurricanes, droughts and rising sea levels. Meanwhile, Latin America's contribution to energy-related emissions is increasing due to strong economic growth and a spike in demand for transportation and electricity. Thus, one of the greatest challenges for policymakers in Latin American countries is to construct a path toward sustainable, low carbon economic development. This course aims to give students a sound understanding of the concepts of climate change and environmental policy, the major policy challenges facing Latin American countries and best practices being used in Latin America and other countries around the world.

 

IAFF 6358 Latin America-China Relations

Over the past decade, China has emerged as a principal economic partner for much of Latin America. China is a top trade partner for several countries in the region and the primary export destination for South American nations. China's policy banks issued over $130 billion in finance to the region since 2005. And Chinese companies are becoming increasingly dominant actors in some of the region's main economic sectors. This course will examine whether and how China's economic activity in Latin America will evolve in the coming years, taking China's domestic considerations, evolving Belt and Road objectives, Latin American political economy, US policy, and other factors into account. We will examine the growing literature on China’s economic interests and impact in Latin America, including perspectives from China, the Latin American region, the US policy community, and other actors. We will also address the political, social, and security-related elements of Latin America's over two decades of enhanced relations with China. The course will be carried out as a seminar, requiring active participation from all students. Students will be expected to engage in analytical exploration, serve as class discussion leaders, perform productive peer review, and carry out and present a case study/research project.

 

IAFF 6358 Security in the Americas

The course will provide students with an overview of the nature, interrelatedness, and impact of contemporary security challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. The class reviews recent developments in and effects of organized crime, illicit drug trafficking, terrorism, arms trafficking, transnational gangs, corruption, and money laundering, among other issues. This is done with the aim of developing critical thinking skills and a deep understanding of the complexities to effectively control the effects of transnational security challenges in the region, in the context of globalization and the current technological revolution.

 

IAFF 6361 Middle East Studies Cornerstone

This course is intended for MES graduate students only.

 

IAFF 6377 Middle East Studies Capstone

This course is intended for MES graduate students only.

 

IAFF 6378 US Policy in the Gulf

On March 19, 2003, forces of the United States and coalition countries opened military action against Iraq that resulted in the overthrow of Saddam Hussein and eight years of US military presence. This military intervention focused Americans on the Persian Gulf region. Yet, the coalition’s war with Iraq was neither the beginning nor the end of U.S. engagement in the Persian Gulf—a strategic body of water whose very name is under dispute. This course focuses on the evolution of United States foreign policy in the Persian Gulf from the end of World War II to present, examining both its causes and effects. The Cold War, Arab Nationalism, Islam, oil, and regional rivalries will be looked at as factors impacting U.S. decision-making and actions.

 

 

 

IAFF 6378 Politics of Youth in the Middle East

The 2009 Iranian Green movement. The 2011 Arab Spring uprisings. The 2013 Turkish Gezi park protests. The 2019 October revolution in Lebanon.  These political episodes present the world with the idea and image of revolutionary youth in the Middle East: challenging the political order, social norms and economic practices.  These protests highlight new forms of contentious politics.  But they also communicate new issues and altered sensibilities that have persisted beyond often disappointing political outcomes.  The past decade has provided political revolutionaries, yes, but also social entrepreneurs and artists.

 

How do we explain this rise in youth mobilization?  Is it distinct to the Middle East, or should it be seen as part of a global wave of youth activism?  How should one conceptualize the idea of generations and the meaning of generational change?  And how is this focus on youth and their needs changing both public attitudes and government policies in the Middle East? 

 

This seminar will take a closer look at youth politics in all its forms - through both case studies and more conceptual works – to come to a better assessment of a decade of change in the Middle East.

 

IAFF 6378 Iran in the Middle East

Iran has long played a critical role in the international relations of the Middle East –historically one of the most tumultuous regions in the world.  In this graduate course, we will critically discuss Iran's foreign and security policies, against the backdrop of its controversial nuclear program and its contentious relations with other regional players, especially Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Israel. Students will learn about the goals, characteristics, and evolution of Iran’s regional policies and the daunting challenges it faces.

 

IAFF 6378: Political Economy of the Middle East

The Middle East is a complex, dynamic and critical region of the world. Its politics move rapidly, sometimes radically, and its economies are diverse, but with many commonalities. The interaction between domestic politics, domestic economic forces, and globalization has been amply demonstrated by the Arab Spring and its aftermath. Clearly, economic forces serve to both generate and allocate a society’s resources. Success or failure in the ability to produce income and appropriately allocate it is a critical factor for social stability and a frequent influence on relations with external actors, most commonly neighboring states or more distant ones such the U.S., China, or other global powers. Other important actors, non-state ones, include the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, OPEC, and terrorist groups. A proper understanding of this region requires an appreciation of its economic challenges and processes as well as the interplay between economic policies/outcomes and domestic/international political forces.

 

IAFF 6385 Rising China in Africa

This course looks at the totality of the China-Africa relationship historically, currently and into the future. It follows six years of research and writing for a book that I co-authored with Josh Eisenman published in 2012 by the University of Pennsylvania Press and titled China and Africa: A Century of Engagement. The course, which covers both North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa, will give special attention to the security interests of China in Africa’s 54 countries.

 

IAFF 6385 Transnational Security Threats in Africa

This course examines contemporary transnational security threats in Africa, including violent extremism; trafficking of narcotics and wildlife; human trafficking and smuggling; maritime insecurity; and corruption and money laundering. discussions will center on the political, economic, and social contexts out of which these threats arise, and the local, regional, and global factors that fuel or facilitate them. Students will assess responses to these threats by African governments, regional organizations, and international actors, and consider what new capacities and approaches will be required to effectively combat them.

 

IAFF 6385 Power, Politics, and Development in Africa

Students in the course will be exposed to the broad themes related to the field of development, specifically in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will be exposed to a cross-section of orientations towards development from various academic fields, with a specific focus on social, political, and economic development. Students will have wide latitude in guiding their study to best meet their interests beyond the core question of the class, which is: What are the key causal inputs to lagging development in Sub-Saharan Africa, and what is the most impactful means to design or assess “interventions?” Learning in this course will involve a mixture of styles, including learning by teaching, collaboration, and demonstration.

 

IAFF 6501 Quantitative Analysis in International Affairs Practices

This course is designed to provide a strong analytical foundation in elementary statistical reasoning and techniques, and the skills necessary to understand, evaluate, and critic, claims, and conventional wisdom and popular opinion. Topics include descriptive statistics; sampling and statistical inference; testing for differences between means; techniques for analyzing categorical data; correlation, and measures of association; summarizing and presenting statistical results; and some of the fundamental issues of research study design. The course is rigorous but does not require an advanced mathematics background. Class time will be a mix of lecture, discussion, and hands-on computer work. Class attendance is essential.

 

IAFF 6502 Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation for Development

This skills seminar will introduce the student to practical frameworks and tools for participatory design, monitoring, and evaluation of international development programs. The course will familiarize students with the broader international development discourse as the context for current practice in participatory monitoring and evaluation. Drawing upon case studies from democracy and governance programming, the course will facilitate student learning through the use of three interactive workshops, assigned readings, and a final written assignment.

 

IAFF 6502 Negotiation Skills

This course is designed to enhance the participants’ negotiation and leadership skills for managing differences between individuals and groups. Class members will learn how to handle two and multiparty negotiations and analyze the importance of empathy and creative option design.  The course will be a blend of skill-building exercises and discussions about the behavior of individuals to understand the negotiation dynamics.

 

IAFF 6502 Mediation

Third-parties are increasingly being used by people in conflict, both domestically and internationally, to help them resolve their differences. Whether providing a space for belligerents to reach a peace agreement, facilitating a contentious public policy debate on the Hill, or helping departments work more effectively together, this interactive skills building course will teach you how to harness conflictual energy and transform it into collaboration. Mediation is an impartial, voluntary and confidential process that facilitates problem-solving and helps parties to a conflict develop solutions that meet everyone’s needs. In this highly experiential course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of mediation; learn how to engage the parties in a conflict and set up the mediation space; how to listen and gather information by disaggregating positional statements; framing and listing problems to resolve; brainstorming and developing solutions; and writing an agreement.

 

IAFF 6502 Technology for International Crisis Response

The advent of new technologies has fundamentally changed the capacity for processing and exchanging information in the 21st century. This professional development course will explore how technology is being used to respond to crises, create early warning mechanisms, monitor elections, provide banking services, ensure effective governance, and much more. It will also consider some of the key challenges related to access, implementation, scale, and evaluation that working with technology presents. The course is designed for graduate students to assist them in developing concrete strategies and technological skills to work amid this rapidly evolving landscape. Students can expect a hands-on and interactive learning environment with a variety of real-world examples from organizations working in the field.

 

 

IAFF 6502 Formal Briefing

This course explores the why, what, and how of creating and presenting information to an audience. It will start with why briefings are an important mode of expression, and why storytelling is the single most important consideration in conceptual design.

 

IAFF 6502 Communication Practices for Employer Engagement

This is a skills course for graduate students enrolled in the Elliott School of International Affairs designed to equip them with the tools they’ll need to 1. create an informed and intentional career development strategy 2. Effectively engage employers and 3. Develop into more polished executive communicators particularly within a virtual office.  The course goes beyond a one or two-time engagement with advisors or coaches of the Office of Graduate Student Services and prepares students for their first 100 days on the job. In particular, the course requires students to: 1) Develop self-awareness through assessments including the MBTI (currently offered to all students) and Crucial Conversations (not offered widely due to cost), a workshop designed to sharpen cultural competency by practicing the skill of leading difficult conversations; 2) Identify and practice the principles of learning based versus need based networking by requiring students to conduct outreach to stakeholders in the field as an assignment; and 3) Cultivate contacts and connect consistently to the employer landscape through class. Overall, the course is designed for students to assess, explore, and leverage their personal strengths, academic interests, and values as they compose their graduate and postgraduate career goals. The course will be taught in alignment with APSIA industry standards and as a result, will focus on the key competencies (communications, global perspectives, teamwork and critical thinking) needed for success as an international affairs practitioner.

 

IAFF 6502 Writing for International Policymakers

Clear, concise and persuasive analytic writing is an essential skill for international affairs professionals. Effective analysis for policymakers succinctly assesses matters in ways that provide information, context, and insight and makes useful recommendations. Key characteristics include focus, relevance, brevity, and readability.  This course will involve short written assignments, as well as group discussions and peer critiques, aimed at developing the writing and analytic skills necessary to support, inform, and influence policymakers and implement policy.

 

IAFF 6502 Cross Cultural Communications

The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively across cultures has become both more critical and more difficult in today’s global environment. The focus of the course will be the development of cross-cultural communications/awareness, management, and negotiation skills. National, regional and universal levels of culture and communications will be explored. Course methodologies will include case studies, videos, simulation, and assessment instruments relative to communicating and working in multicultural settings. The course also uses a comparativist approach to flesh out the significance and implications of cultural underpinnings, factors, and variables necessary for successful communication between cultures and individuals in an increasingly globalized world.

 

IAFF 6502 Advocating for Women's Rights

This skills class will equip students with the building blocks for conducting successful advocacy efforts on global women’s issues. It will foster an understanding of different elements of an advocacy campaign, from grassroots mobilization to direct engagement of policymakers through individual, celebrity and coalition advocacy. It will build students’ skills in various tactics such as identifying the elements of “the ask,” crafting successful messages, building and managing coalitions, conducting power analysis, crafting the “elevator pitch,” and tailoring messaging for media. Finally, it will examine successful case studies of gender-responsive foreign policy from the perspective of advocates and policymakers alike.

 

IAFF 6502 Public Opinion in International Affairs

The goals of the course are to make students conversant in survey research, better consumers of public opinion data and gain the ability to use survey data in their work—all without having to become a statistician! This course will offer specific examples of how public opinion data has been used to inform policymakers. This is followed by a comparison of the validity of traditional survey research methods versus the more newly arrived social media sentiment analysis. It will provide an overview of the different methods of data collection as well as an introduction to sampling and questionnaire design and quality control measures. Students will then be exposed to how data is interpreted and used to form the backbone of pithy and cogent analyses. The course will conclude with an exercise in which students will review a data set and draft a policy memo based on a particular theme.

 

IAFF 6502 International Non-Profit Management

The nonprofit sector has grown exponentially in the last few decades – both domestically and internationally - and so have the competing demands to demonstrate data-driven results, raise public awareness and fundraise on multiple platforms. These competing demands require effective management skills to run non-profit organizations and achieve impact. Key skills include defining, understanding and ongoing assessment of an organization’s mission, communication and advocacy strategies, effective programs, development and financial targets, identification of fundraising opportunities and management of a team that may even meet in person regularly. This course will be taught by learning how to evaluate non-profit organizations using a Non-Profit Organizational Capacity Mapping Framework and by discussing Case Studies in class. Prior reading of the Case Studies for each seminar class is required because the case studies will be taught using the Socratic Method with students explaining the Case Studies and Responding to questions by the Lecturer and other students. The themes that will be covered by both the case studies and the Capacity Mapping Framework will include lectures and discussions about Mission; Program/Theory of Change; Evaluation & Log Frames; Fundraising & Communication Strategies; NGO Management in the 21st Century and Non-Profit Governance. For the course’s final project, students will be divided into teams and given the assignment to jointly draft and present a program proposal for funding that clearly demonstrates their grasp and application of the topics covered in the course.

 

IAFF 6503 Leadership and Teamwork

This course explores the dynamics of teambuilding, communication, and leadership that will increase managerial effectiveness. Topics include: communication and conflict, decision-making and problem-solving, teams vs. groups, group dynamics, consensus, team building and leadership.  Students participate in experiential exercises that provide them with the opportunity to learn critical skills needed to improve teamwork and be effective organizational members.

 

IAFF 6503 Ethics in International Affairs

This is a course in applied ethics, dealing with questions and problems of ethics that occur in international affairs.  Among other concerns, this includes such issues as human rights both national and international, international business, war, globalization, and global assistance and humanitarian intervention(s). We will discuss and analyze, and attempt to find ways and/or methods or steps or techniques to solve ethical disputes and issues that arise in international affairs.

 

IAFF 6503 Gender Monitoring and Evaluation

The course will introduce graduate students to setting gender and social inclusion-related targets and indicators, how to use gender and social inclusion-related indices, how to create an activity monitoring and evaluation and learning plan (AMELP) all in the context of international development projects and with the goal to transform projects into gender equitable and socially inclusive activities. Students will study proposals, case studies, and multiple global indices.

 

 

IAFF 6503 Introduction to Gaming and Simulations

Introductions to Gaming and Simulations provides first-hand experience in scenario and gaming analysis. The course specifically addresses the fundamentals of game development and employment based on government and industry best practices. Through lectures, readings, in-class exercises, and group assignments students will build the repertoire of skills needed to create high-impact games and simulations while simultaneously honing their ability to review and judge gaming proposals.

 

IAFF 6503 Mobile Phones for International Development

The mobile phone is rapidly bringing communication to the most remote areas of the world. NGOs, governments and companies alike are beginning to realize the potential of this ubiquitous tool to address social challenges. This course will explore successful applications that facilitate economic transactions, support public health campaigns and connect learners to educational content. It will also critically engage with issues of equity, privacy, and access. Participants can expect a dynamic and practical learning environment with a number of real-world examples and case studies.

 

IAFF 6503 Congress and Foreign Policy

The class will examine the ways in which Congress and the Executive branch interact to shape U.S. foreign and national security policy. The class will consider practical details such as how Congress is structured, and how the budget and appropriations process that funds U.S. international spending operates. It will also look at the political imperatives that influence how members of Congress and their staffers develop their views on U.S. foreign policy. After an informal introduction to how Congress works, the focus will be on real-world case studies and hands-on simulations, with in-class exercises that will permit students to better understand what role the Congress plays in determining U.S. foreign policy, how it does so, and why.

 

IAFF 6503 Writing for International Policymakers

Clear, concise and persuasive analytic writing is an essential skill for international affairs professionals. Effective analysis for policymakers succinctly assesses matters in ways that provide information, context, and insight and makes useful recommendations. Key characteristics include focus, relevance, brevity, and readability.  This course will involve short written assignments, as well as group discussions and peer critiques, aimed at developing the writing and analytic skills necessary to support, inform, and influence policymakers and implement policy.

 

IAFF 6503 Political Risk Analysis

Political risk, broadly, the possibility of politically related uncertainty affecting an objective, is an important factor in shaping outcomes in frontier, emerging, and even developed markets and is a vital consideration for individuals, companies, organizations, and nation-states with investments or interests in the international sphere. Political risk emanates from various sources and occurs based on the actions or reactions of stakeholders to various events. Even so, political risk remains a somewhat amorphous and often ambiguous subject. Its definition can vary greatly and while myriad methodologies for addressing political risk exist, no singular method is used universally. As such, this course takes a multi-disciplinary approach drawing from political theory, international relations, economics, risk management, intelligence, and strategic communications and applies this approach to relevant, real world problems. Emphasis is placed on strategies that measure and mitigate political risk in a range of environments at the macro and micro levels. This course connects theory, research, practice, and empirical evidence in order to address the complexities of political risk analysis and it draws on academic literature while also focusing on the development of practical knowledge and skills that are applicable to both the public and private sector.

 

IAFF 6503 Military Superiority and the Role of Defense Contracting

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the role of government contracting in National Security.  It will benefit students interested in entering government service or the consulting/manufacturing world.   Students will learn about the development of requirements for critical space, land, sea, air, and cyber assets and understand how industry translates these requirements into military assets and capabilities.  They will gain practical insight on how to analyze, shape and bid on solicitations within the Department of Defense and associated entities.  In addition, they will learn about the often-hidden external considerations such as congressional pressures, lobbying, and inter-service rivalries that play a role in influencing the selection of a particular contractor.

 

IAFF 6504 Int Proficiency - Russian  

A short, intensive 1-credit course designed to develop professional Russian language skills for international affairs students.

 

IAFF 6504  Int Proficiency – French

A short, intensive 1-credit course designed to develop professional French language skills for international affairs students.

 

IAFF 6504  Int Proficiency – Spanish

A short, intensive 1-credit course designed to develop professional Spanish language skills for international affairs students.

 

IAFF 6504  Int Proficiency – Arabic

A short, intensive 1-credit course designed to develop professional Arabic language skills for international affairs students.

 

IAFF 6504  Int Proficiency – Chinese

A short, intensive 1-credit course designed to develop professional Chinese language skills for international affairs students.

 

IAFF 6898 Capstone Workshop

First part of two-semester sequence that addresses a concrete policy problem or issue in international affairs. In small teams, students refine the policy question of the capstone project, develop a research strategy, select appropriate research methods, and begin research. Continued in IAFF 6899.

 

IAFF 6899 Capstone Course

Second part of a two-semester sequence. Completion of the capstone sequence by conduct of the group's research, completion of the capstone report, and oral presentation of research findings and recommendations. Prerequisite: IAFF 6898.