photo: Students Walk to class, horizontal line, outlines of the George statue, GW gate, and tempietto

Current Students

Elliott School students are service-oriented, civically-engaged, and internationally–minded. Whether you are an undergraduate or graduate student, the Elliott School provides diverse learning experiences that prepare you to address global challenges and questions in ways that go beyond single disciplinary perspectives.

The Elliott School is leading the way in the training of ethics and practice to produce the next generation of leaders in international affairs. Through experiences in and outside of the classroom, you are trained and prepared to show employers not only what you know, but what you know how to do. 

 


"My career goal is to work for the UN or Department of State. Eventually, I hope to serve as an elected official. I chose the Elliott School because, after visiting several schools in the area, I felt this was where I fit in."

Camisha Johnson

MAIA Student
International Security Studies and Conflict Resolution 


 

Student Advising Services

While students are responsible for determining their schedule and meeting all degree requirements, an Academic Advisor can help you with:

  • Learn and understand your degree requirements

  • Navigate course options, programs and other learning opportunities

  • Plan for a study abroad experience

  • Monitor your progress towards graduation

  • Utilize other campus resources

  • Successfully complete your degree

 

Graduate Advising Appointments Undergraduate Advising Appointments

 


 

photo: Taking place in Kenya, GW student Francesca Diggs stands in the middle of a group of over 50 children in front of a school bus. The children, who are waving and smiling with excitement, are wearing vibrant green and red traditional uniforms. Behind them is the serene, vast landscape of Kenya

 

 

International Internship Grant: A Reflection by Elliott School Student Francesca Diggs

Since 2012, Children Peace Initiative has been working with remote communities in northwestern Kenya to resolve conflic between feuding pastoralist tribes by engaging their children in peacebuilding programs that depend upon inter-ethnic friendships. Through this fellowship, I have been able to travel to these villages and interview beneficiaries to monitor and evaluate impact. The stories I've heard from children and their families reflect that CPI's peacebuilding model has not only developed enduring friendships, but has completely transformed these communities so that they depend on each other to share resources, services and markets. I am gaining invaluable experience working on the ground with stakeholders and hearing their stories.