photo: Christopher Cahill

Christopher L. Cahill

Title:
Professor of Chemistry and International Affairs
Office:
Room 315
Address: Samson Hall
2036 H Street, NW
Phone: 202-994-6959
Fax: 202-994-5873
Email:
cahill@gwu.edu
Website:

Areas of Expertise

Solid-state and materials chemistry of the f-elements, crystallography, nuclear fuel cycle

Background

Christopher Cahill is an expert in solid-state and materials chemistry with a particular emphasis on X-ray crystallography. His synthesis expertise includes high temperature techniques, as well as hydrothermal systems to produce novel hybrid materials of relevance to the nuclear fuel cycle. He has published over 85 peer reviewed papers in a range of areas related to the synthesis and structural characterization of materials and minerals. Current research areas include exploring the behavior of uranium species under environmentally relevant conditions as well as the synthesis of lanthanide containing sensor materials. More recent efforts include nuclear science curriculum development for non-technical individuals within both the energy and weapons proliferation arenas.

Professor Cahill earned a BS in Chemistry and Geochemistry from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Fredonia (1993) and a PhD in Chemistry from SUNY-Stony Brook (1999). He joined the faculty of GWU in 2000 after a one-year post-doctoral position in the Environmental Mineralogy group at the University of Notre Dame. He is a recipient of the prestigious NSF CAREER Award (2004), a Bender Teaching Award (2005) and a Fulbright Scholarship (2008). He is a member of the US National Committee for Crystallography and has held visiting researcher positions at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and Argonne National Laboratory.

Education

Ph.D., SUNY-Stony Brook

Classes Taught

CHEM 1111 General Chemistry I

CHEM 1112 General Chemistry II

CHEM 4134 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 6235 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

IAFF 6186 Special Topics in Security Policy Studies

  • The Science of Nuclear Materials