2013 Books

November 27, 2013


book cover: Conflicts in the Persian Gulf

Hossein Askari, Iran Professor of International Business and International Affairs

Conflicts in the Persian Gulf: Origins and Evolution (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).

The evolution of most conflicts have, over time, evolved into one — power and control over resources. Although the origins of conflicts in the region are varied, as conflicts evolve, the quest for 'revenge' to settle old scores is only the apparent fuel but its essential fuel is the control of resources and their distribution. Reconciliation will require the simultaneous adoption of foundational political, social and economic reforms and the cooperation of the global powers to end support of dictators and bring justice to these societies.

 

book cover: Collaborative Colonialism

Hossein Askari, Iran Professor of International Business and International Affairs

Collaborative Colonialism: The Political Economy of Oil in the Persian Gulf (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).

Offering an incisive chronological account of the impact of oil on Persian Gulf countries, Hossein Askari examines how vast oil revenues have encouraged oppressive governance and corrupted development policies, impeding human, political, and economic progress. The early exploitation of the region's oil was colonial in practice; today, foreigners and oppressive rulers work hand-in-hand at citizens' expense. There is an urgent need for visionary political and economic reform to prevent a regional catastrophe. Rulers must start by acknowledging that oil belongs to all generations to be managed efficiently, equitably, and transparently.

 

book cover: Building a House in Heaven

Mona Atia, Assistant Professor of Geography and International Affairs

Building a House in Heaven: Pious Neoliberalism and Islamic Charity in Egypt. (University of Minnesota Press, 2013).

The merging of religion, capitalism, and politics in Islamic charities in Egypt

In Building a House in Heaven, Mona Atia makes the connection between Islam and capitalism to examine the surprising relations between charity and the economy, the state, and religion in the transition from Mubarak-era Egypt. She draws on interviews with key players, exploring the geography of Islamic charities through multiple neighborhoods, ideologies, sources of funding, projects, and wide social networks.

 

book cover: The Rule of Law, Islam, and Constitutional Politics in Egypt and Iran

Nathan J. Brown, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

The Rule of Law, Islam, and Constitutional Politics in Egypt and Iran. Nathan Brown and Saïd Amir Arjomand, Eds. (State University of New York Press, 2013).

In recent years, Egypt and Iran have been beset with demands for fundamental change. The Rule of Law, Islam, and Constitutional Politics in Egypt and Iran draws together leading regional experts to provide a penetrating comparative analysis of the ways Islam is entangled with the process of democratization in authoritarian regimes. By comparing Islam and the rule of law in these two nations, one Sunni and Arab-speaking, the other Shi'ite and Persian-speaking, this volume enriches the current debate on Islam and democracy, making for a more nuanced understanding and appreciation of differences with the Muslim world, and provides an indispensible background for understanding the Green movement in Iran since 2009 and the Egyptian revolution of 2011.

 

book cover: Every Rock a Universe

Jonathan Chaves, Professor of Chinese

Every Rock a Universe: The Yellow Mountains and Chinese Travel Writing. (Floating World Editions, 2013).

The Yellow Mountains (Huangshan) of China's Anhui province have been famous for centuries as a place of scenic beauty and inspiration, and remain a hugely popular tourist destination today. A "golden age" of Yellow Mountains travel came in the seventeenth century, when they became a refuge for loyalists protesting the new Qing dynasty, among them poet and artist Wang Hongdu (1646–1721/1722), who dedicated himself to traveling to each and every peak and site and recording his impressions. Unfortunately, his resulting masterpiece of Chinese travel writing was not printed until 1775 and has since remained obscure and available only in Chinese.

Here Jonathan Chaves presents the first complete translation of Wang's work in a Western language. Wang's newly rediscovered verse is also translated, showing him to be one of the most accomplished poets of his day. Introductory essays explore the history of scholarly and religious pilgrimage to the area, and the role of the Yellow Mountains in the great Neo-Confucian, Buddhist, and Daoist revivals of the early Qing period, that is, as the center of a yearned-for spiritual and cultural renaissance.

 

book cover: Latin America's Multicultural Movements

Michael S. Danielson, Visiting Assistant Professor of International Affairs

Latin America's Multicultural Movements: The Struggle Between Communitarianism, Autonomy, and Human Rights. Todd A. Eisenstadt, Michael S. Danielson, Moises Jaime Bailon Corres, and Sorroza Polo, Eds. (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Throughout the Americas, indigenous people have been arguing that they should be entitled, as "first peoples," to representation in local, national, and international fora in a capacity different from that of other civil society groups. Latin America's Multicultural Movements is a collection of empirically-based chapters that advance debates concerning multiculturalism and indigenous and minority group rights in Latin America by looking at the struggle between communitarianism, autonomy, and human rights. Rather than advancing a particular argument for or against multiculturalism, the book includes contributions from top Latin American scholars with a range of ideological positions to provide a comparative set of perspectives on the issue. While the book addresses highly polemical debates, it does so in a way that moves beyond the ideological clashes that characterize most of the literature and invites readers to explore how multicultural reforms affect people in their everyday lives, as well as in political parties, elected offices, and interest groups. The chapters, which include case studies from Mexico, Bolivia and Ecuador, look at the controversial role of the state regarding multicultural rights and discuss whether the state enables or hinders the advancement of multicultural rights.

 

book cover: Back to Basics

Martha Finnemore, University Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Back to Basics: State Power in a Contemporary World, Martha Finnemore and Judith Goldstein, Eds., Oxford University Press, 2013.

No scholar better exemplifies the intellectual challenges foisted on the Neorealist school of international relations than prominent scholar Stephen Krasner (Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Studies, the Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, and Director of Policy Planning at the US State Department 2005-2007). Throughout his career he has wrestled with realism's promises and limitations. Krasner has always been a prominent defender of realism and the importance of power understood in material terms, whether military or economic. Yet realist frameworks rarely provided a complete explanation for outcomes, in Krasner's analyses, and much of his work involved understanding power's role in situations not well explained by realism. If states seek power, why do we see cooperation? If hegemony promotes cooperation why does cooperation continue in the face of America's decline? Do states actually pursue their national interests or do domestic structures and values derail the rational pursuit of material objectives? Krasner's explanations were as diverse as were the problems. They pushed, to use his phrase, "the limits of realism."

Edited by Martha Finnemore and Judith Goldstein, Back to Basics asks scholars to reflect on the role power plays in contemporary politics and how a power politics approach is influential today. The arguments made by the authors in this volume speak to one of three themes that run through Krasner's work: state power and hegemony; the relationship between states and markets; conceptions of the nation state in international politics. These themes appeared regularly in Krasner's scholarship as he wrestled, over his career, with fundamental questions of inter-state politics. Contributors largely agree on the centrality of power but diverge substantially on the ways power is manifest and should be measured and understood. Many of the contributors confronted the same intellectual dilemmas as Krasner in struggling to define power and its relationship to interests, yet their responses are different. Together, these essays explore new ways of thinking about power's role in contemporary politics and demonstrate the concepts continued relevance for both policy and theory.

 

book cover: A Unified Approach to Measuring Poverty and Inequality

James Foster, Professor of Economics and International Affairs; Director, Institute for International Economic Policy

A Unified Approach to Measuring Poverty and Inequality: Theory and Practice. James Foster, Suman Seth, Michael Lokshin, Zurab Sajaia. World Bank, 2013.

A Unified Approach to Measuring Poverty and Inequality is an introduction to the theory and practice of measuring poverty and inequality, as well as a user's guide for analyzing income or consumption distribution for any standard household dataset using the World Bank's ADePT software. The approach taken here considers income standards as building blocks for basic measurement, then uses them to construct inequality and poverty measures. This unified approach provides advantages in interpreting and contrasting the measures and in understanding the way measures vary over time and space.

Several recent initiatives have lowered the cost of accessing household datasets. The ADePT software enables users to analyze microdata from household surveys and other sources and generate print-ready, standardized tables and charts. It can also be used to simulate the impact of economic shocks, cash transfers and other policy instruments on poverty, and inequality. The software automates analysis, helps minimize human errors, and encourages development of new economic analysis methods. Of interest to teachers and students as well as to policy practitioners, A Unified Approach to Measuring Poverty and Inequality will empower researchers to plumb greater depths in searching for regularity in larger and larger datasets. This book should help to enrich discussion and analysis relating to the World Bank's recent effort toward defining new targets and indicators for promoting work on eradicating poverty and enhancing shared prosperity.

 

book cover: Crowdsourcing For Dummies

David Alan Grier, Associate Professor of International Science and Technology Policy and International Affairs

Crowdsourcing For Dummies, Wiley: For Dummies, 2013.

Crowdsourcing is an innovative way of outsourcing tasks, problems or requests to a group or community online. There are lots of ways business can use crowdsourcing to their advantage: be it crowdsourcing product ideas and development, design tasks, market research, testing, capturing or analyzing data, and even raising funds. It offers access to a wide pool of talent and ideas, and is an exciting way to engage the public with your business.

Crowdsourcing For Dummies is your plain-English guide to making crowdsourcing, crowdfunding and open innovation work for you. It gives step-by-step advice on how to plan, start and manage a crowdsourcing project, where to crowdsource, how to find the perfect audience, how best to motivate your crowd, and tips for troubleshooting.

 

book cover: En minga por el Cauca

David Gow, Professor Emeritus

En minga por el Cauca: el gobierno del Taita Floro Tunubalá (2001-2003). GOW, David D. and JARAMILLO SALGADO, Diego (Siglo del Hombre Editores, 2013).

 

book cover: Africa in World Politics

John Harbeson, Professorial Lecturer

Africa in World Politics: Engaging a Changing Global Order, John Harbeson and Donald Rothchild, Eds., Westview Press, 2013.

In this fully revised edition top scholars in African politics address the effects that major currents in Africa and world politics have upon each other and explore the ramifications of this interconnection for contemporary theories of international and comparative politics.

The fifth edition focuses on engaging a changing world order. The nation-state as we know it is a legacy of European rule in Africa, and the primacy of the nation-state remains the bedrock of most contemporary theories of international relations. Yet in the fifth decade of Africa's independence, this colonial inheritance has been challenged as never before by state weakness, internal and inter-state conflict, new gains in economic development, large investments by China and other G-20 countries, and internal and external demands for economic and political reform, with potentially far-reaching implications. Including six new chapters on warfare, bilateral vs. multilateral peacekeeping, Sudan, the Great Lakes Crisis, and China and Africa, this text remains an invaluable resource for students of African and world politics.

 

book cover: Beyond Swat

Benjamin Hopkins, Assistant Professor of History and International Affairs

Beyond Swat: History, Society and Economy Along the Afghanistan-Pakistan Frontier. Magnus Marsden and Benjamin Hopkins, Eds. (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Written by anthropologists and historians with long-standing research experience in Afghanistan and Pakistan, as well as expertise in one or more of the region's languages, each chapter explores varying yet interconnected dimensions of the region's culture, society and politics over a broad span of history and their relevance to wider debates about the dynamics shaping this and other comparable 'frontier' spaces. The parallels the authors make cross temporal, as well as spatial boundaries and, in doing so, open up theoretically innovative lines of scholarly enquiry about the Afghanistan-Pakistan Frontier, the nature of Islamic militancy, its connections to ethnicity, class and transformations in the nature of state power, and, more generally, the relationship between anthropology and history.

 

book cover: Africa in World Politics

John Harbeson, Professorial Lecturer

Africa in World Politics: Engaging a Changing Global Order, John Harbeson and Donald Rothchild, Eds., Westview Press, 2013.

In this fully revised edition top scholars in African politics address the effects that major currents in Africa and world politics have upon each other and explore the ramifications of this interconnection for contemporary theories of international and comparative politics.

The fifth edition focuses on engaging a changing world order. The nation-state as we know it is a legacy of European rule in Africa, and the primacy of the nation-state remains the bedrock of most contemporary theories of international relations. Yet in the fifth decade of Africa's independence, this colonial inheritance has been challenged as never before by state weakness, internal and inter-state conflict, new gains in economic development, large investments by China and other G-20 countries, and internal and external demands for economic and political reform, with potentially far-reaching implications. Including six new chapters on warfare, bilateral vs. multilateral peacekeeping, Sudan, the Great Lakes Crisis, and China and Africa, this text remains an invaluable resource for students of African and world politics.

 

book cover:Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America

Stephen B. Kaplan, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

In an age of financial globalization, are markets and democracy compatible? For developing countries, the dramatic internationalization of financial markets over the last two decades deepens tensions between politics and markets. Notwithstanding the rise of left-leaning governments in regions like Latin America, macroeconomic policies often have a neoliberal appearance. When is austerity imposed externally and when is it a domestic political choice? By combining statistical tests with extensive field research across Latin America, Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America examines the effect of financial globalization on economic policymaking. Kaplan argues that a country's structural composition of international borrowing and its individual technocratic understanding of past economic crises combine to produce dramatically different outcomes in national policy choices. Incorporating these factors into an electoral politics framework, the book then challenges the conventional wisdom that political business cycles are prevalent in newly democratizing regions. This book is accessible to a broad audience and scholars with an interest in the political economy of finance, development and democracy, and Latin American politics.

 

book cover: The Last Blank Spaces

Dane Kennedy, Elmer Louis Kayser Professor of History and International Affairs

The Last Blank Spaces: Exploring Africa and Australia, Harvard University Press 2013.

For a British Empire that stretched across much of the globe at the start of the nineteenth century, the interiors of Africa and Australia remained intriguing mysteries. The challenge of opening these continents to imperial influence fell to a proto-professional coterie of determined explorers. They sought knowledge, adventure, and fame, but often experienced confusion, fear, and failure. The Last Blank Spaces follows the arc of these explorations, from idea to practice, from intention to outcome, from myth to reality.

Those who conducted the hundreds of expeditions that probed Africa and Australia in the nineteenth century adopted a mode of scientific investigation that had been developed by previous generations of seaborne explorers. They likened the two continents to oceans, empty spaces that could be made truly knowable only by mapping, measuring, observing, and preserving. They found, however, that their survival and success depended less on this system of universal knowledge than it did on the local knowledge possessed by native peoples.

While explorers sought to advance the interests of Britain and its emigrant communities, Dane Kennedy discovers a more complex outcome: expeditions that failed ignominiously, explorers whose loyalties proved ambivalent or divided, and, above all, local states and peoples who diverted expeditions to serve their own purposes. The collisions, and occasional convergences, between British and indigenous values, interests, and modes of knowing the world are brought to the fore in this fresh and engaging study.

 

book cover: Reinterpreting Exploration

Dane Kennedy, Elmer Louis Kayser Professor of History and International Affairs

Reinterpreting Exploration: The West in the World. Dane Kennedy, Ed. (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Exploration was a central and perhaps defining aspect of the West's encounters with other peoples and lands. Rather than reproduce celebratory narratives of individual heroism and national glory, this volume focuses on exploration's instrumental role in shaping a European sense of exceptionalism and its iconic importance in defining the terms of cultural engagement with other peoples. In chapters offering broad geographic range, the contributors address many of the key themes of recent research on exploration, including exploration's contribution to European imperial expansion, Western scientific knowledge, Enlightenment ideas and practices, and metropolitan print culture. They reassess indigenous peoples' responses upon first contacts with European explorers, their involvement as intermediaries in the operations of expeditions, and the complications that their prior knowledge posed for European claims of discovery. Underscoring that exploration must be seen as a process of mediation between representation and reality, this book provides a fresh and accessible introduction to the ongoing reinterpretation of exploration's role in the making of the modern world.

 

book cover: Iraq in WartimeSocial Upheaval as the Face of Globalization in Central Asia

Dina R. Khoury, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs

Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance, Cambridge University Press 2013.

When U.S.-led forces invaded Iraq in 2003, they occupied a country that had been at war for twenty-three years. Yet in their attempts to understand Iraqi society and history, few policy makers, analysts, and journalists took into account the profound impact that Iraq's long engagement with war had on the Iraqis' everyday engagement with politics, with the business of managing their daily lives, and on their cultural imagination.

Starting with the Iran-Iraq War, through the First Gulf War and sanctions, Dina Rizk Khoury traces the political, social, and cultural processes of the normalization of war in Iraq during the last twenty-three years of Ba'thist rule. Drawing on government documents and interviews, Khoury argues that war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance and examines the Iraqi government's policies of creating consent, managing resistance and religious diversity, and shaping public culture. Khoury focuses on the men and families of those who fought and died during the Iran-Iraq and First Gulf wars. Coming on the tenth anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, this book tells a multilayered story of a society in which war has become the norm.

 

book cover: Migration and Social Upheaval as the Face of Globalization in Central Asia

Marlene Laruelle, Research Professor of International Affairs

Migration and Social Upheaval as the Face of Globalization in Central Asia, Marlene Laruelle, Ed., Brill Academic Publishing, 2013.

Since the start of the 1990s, Central Asia has been the main purveyor of migrants in the post-Soviet space. These massive migrations due to social upheavals over the last twenty years impact issues of governance; patterns of social adaptation; individual and collective identities; and gender relations in Central Asia. This volume raises the importance of internal migrations, those at a regional, intra-Central Asian, level, labor migrations to Russia, and carries us as far away to the Uzbek migrants based in Istanbul, New York, or Seoul, as well as to the young women of Tashkent who head to Germany or France, and to the Germans, Greeks, and Jews of Central Asia who have returned to their "ethnic homelands".

 

book cover: Flawed Logics

James H. Lebovic, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Flawed Logics: Strategic Nuclear Arms Control from Truman to Obama, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

James H. Lebovic explores the logic of seeking peace in an arms race.Flawed Logics offers a compelling intellectual history of U.S.-Russian strategic nuclear arms control.

Lebovic thoroughly reviews the critical role of ideas and assumptions in U.S. arms control debates, tying them to controversies over U.S. nuclear strategy from the birth of the atomic age to the present. Each treaty — from Truman to Obama — is assessed in depth and the positions of proponents and opponents are systematically presented, discussed, and critiqued. Lebovic concludes that the terms of these arms treaties with the Russians were never as good as U.S. proponents claimed nor as bad as opponents feared.

The comprehensive analysis in Flawed Logics is objective and balanced, challenging the logic of hawks and doves, Democrats and Republicans, and realists of all schools with equal vigor. Lebovic's controversial argument will promote debate as to the very plausibility of arms control.

 

book cover: Conflict Analysis

Matthew Levinger, Visiting Professor of International Affairs

Conflict Analysis: Understanding Causes, Unlocking Solutions. (U.S. Institute of Peace, 2013).

Conflict Analysis: Understanding Causes, Unlocking Solutions is a guide for practitioners seeking to prevent deadly conflict or mitigate political instability. Governments, nongovernmental organizations, and businesses operating in conflict zones will find this volume to be a practical, accessible reference for understanding and communicating persuasively about threats of organized violence. This handbook integrates theory and practice and emphasizes the importance of analyzing the causes of peace as well as the causes of conflict. It stresses that conflict analysis is a social as well as an intellectual process, helping practitioners translate analysis into effective action. To illustrate key points, Levinger draws on both historical and contemporary cases, including the Cuban missile crisis, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Yugoslav wars of secession, the Rwandan genocide, the 9/11 attacks, and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

 

book cover: General De Gaulle's Cold War

Garret J. Martin, Visiting Professor

General de Gaulle's Cold War: Challenging American Hegemony, 1963-68. (Berghahn Books, 2013).

The greatest threat to the Western alliance in the 1960s did not come from an enemy, but from an ally. France, led by its mercurial leader General Charles de Gaulle, launched a global and comprehensive challenge to the United State’s leadership of the Free World, tackling not only the political but also the military, economic, and monetary spheres. Successive American administrations fretted about de Gaulle, whom they viewed as an irresponsible nationalist at best and a threat to their presence in Europe at worst. Based on extensive international research, this book is an original analysis of France’s ambitious grand strategy during the 1960s and why it eventually failed. De Gaulle’s failed attempt to overcome the Cold War order reveals important insights about why the bipolar international system was able to survive for so long, and why the General’s legacy remains significant to current French foreign policy.

 

book cover: The Politics of Nation-Building

Harris Mylonas, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

What drives a state's choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this innovative work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state's nation-building policies toward non-core groups — any aggregation of individuals perceived as an ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state — are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups. Through a detailed study of the Balkans, Mylonas shows that how a state treats a non-core group within its own borders is determined largely by whether the state's foreign policy is revisionist or cleaves to the international status quo, and whether it is allied or in rivalry with that group's external patrons. Mylonas injects international politics into the study of nation-building, building a bridge between international relations and the comparative politics of ethnicity and nationalism. This is the first book to explain systematically how the politics of ethnicity in the international arena determine which groups are assimilated, accommodated, or annihilated by their host states.

 

book cover: Conservative Internationalism

Henry R. Nau, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Conservative Internationalism: Armed Diplomacy under Jefferson, Polk, Truman, and Reagan, Princeton University Press, 2013

Debates about U.S. foreign policy have revolved around three main traditions—liberal internationalism, realism, and nationalism. In this book, distinguished political scientist Henry Nau delves deeply into a fourth, overlooked foreign policy tradition that he calls "conservative internationalism." This approach spreads freedom, like liberal internationalism; arms diplomacy, like realism; and preserves national sovereignty, like nationalism. It targets a world of limited government or independent "sister republics," not a world of great power concerts or centralized international institutions.

Nau explores conservative internationalism in the foreign policies of Thomas Jefferson, James Polk, Harry Truman, and Ronald Reagan. These presidents did more than any others to expand the arc of freedom using a deft combination of force, diplomacy, and compromise. Since Reagan, presidents have swung back and forth among the main traditions, overreaching under Bush and now retrenching under Obama. Nau demonstrates that conservative internationalism offers an alternative way. It pursues freedom but not everywhere, prioritizing situations that border on existing free countries—Turkey, for example, rather than Iraq. It uses lesser force early to influence negotiations rather than greater force later after negotiations fail. And it reaches timely compromises to cash in military leverage and sustain public support.

A groundbreaking revival of a neglected foreign policy tradition, Conservative Internationalism shows how the United States can effectively sustain global leadership while respecting the constraints of public will and material resources.

 

book cover: Tyranny of Consensus

Janne Nolan, Research Professor

Tyranny of Consensus: Discourse and Dissent in American National Security Policy. (The Century Foundation Press, 2013).

In Tyranny of Consensus, Janne E. Nolan examines three cases—the Islamic Revolution in Iran, the proxy war with the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, and the 1998 embassy bombings in East Africa—to find the limitations of American policy-makers in understanding some of the important developments around the world. Assisted by a working group of senior practitioners and policy experts, Nolan finds that it is often the impulse to protect the already arrived at policy consensus that is to blame for failure. Without access to informed discourse or a functioning “marketplace of ideas,” policy-makers can find themselves unable or unwilling to seriously consider possible correctives even to obviously flawed strategies.

 

book cover: China Goes Global

David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, China Policy Program

China Goes Global: The Partial Power, Oxford University Press, 2013.

Most global citizens are well aware of the explosive growth of the Chinese economy. Indeed, China has famously become the "workshop of the world." Yet, while China watchers have shed much light on the country's internal dynamics — China's politics, its vast social changes, and its economic development — few have focused on how this increasingly powerful nation has become more active and assertive throughout the world.

In China Goes Global David Shambaugh delivers the book many have been waiting for — a sweeping account of China's growing prominence on the international stage. Thirty years ago, China's role in global affairs beyond its immediate East Asian periphery was decidedly minor and it had little geostrategic power. As Shambaugh charts, though, China's expanding economic power has allowed it to extend its reach virtually everywhere — from mineral mines in Africa, to currency markets in the West, to oilfields in the Middle East, to agribusiness in Latin America, to the factories of East Asia. Shambaugh offers an enlightening look into the manifestations of China's global presence: its extensive commercial footprint, its growing military power, its increasing cultural influence or "soft power," its diplomatic activity, and its new prominence in global governance institutions.

 

book cover: Historical Dictionary of Ethiopia Ethiopia, Second Edition

Amb. David Shinn, Adjunct Professor of International Affairs

Historical Dictionary of Ethiopia Ethiopia, Second Edition, David H. Shinn and Thomas P. Ofcansky, Scarecrow Press, 2013.

Ethiopia is clearly one of the most important countries in Africa. First of all, with about 75 million people, it is the third most populous country in Africa. Second, it is very strategically located, in the Horn of Africa and bordering Eritrea, Sudan, Kenya, and Somalia, with some of whom it has touchy and sometimes worse relations. Yet, its capital — Addis Ababa — is the headquarters of the African Union, the prime meeting place for Africa's leaders. So, if things went poorly in Ethiopia, this would not be good for Africa, and for a long time this was the case, with internal disruption rife, until it was literally suppressed under the strong rule of the recently deceased Meles Zenawi.

The Historical Dictionary of Ethiopia, Second Edition covers the history of Ethiopia through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has several hundred cross-referenced entries on important personalities, politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Ethiopia.

 

book cover: Handbook On The Theory And Practice Of Program Evaluation

Nicholas S. Vonortas, Professor of Economics and International Affairs

Handbook on the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation, Albert N. Link , Nicholas S. Vonortas, Eds. (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013).

There has been a dramatic increase in expenditures on public goods over the past thirty years, particularly in the area of research and development. As governments explore the many opportunities for growth in this area, they — and the general public — are becoming increasingly concerned with the transparency, accountability and performance of public programs. This pioneering Handbook offers a collection of critical essays on the theory and practice of program evaluation, written by some of the most well-known experts in the field.

As this volume demonstrates, a wide variety of methodologies exists to evaluate particularly the objectives and outcomes of research and development programs. These include surveys, statistical and econometric estimations, patent analyses, bibliometrics, scientometrics, network analyses, case studies, and historical tracings. Contributors divide these and other methods and applications into four categories — economic, non-economic, hybrid and data-driven — in order to discuss the many factors that affect the utility of each technique and how that impacts the technological, economic and societal forecasts of the programs in question.

Scholars, practitioners and students with an interest in economics and innovation will all find this Handbook an invaluable resource.

 


book cover: Providing Peacekeepers

Paul D. Williams, Associate Professor of International Affairs; Director, Security Policy Studies Program

Providing Peacekeepers: The Politics, Challenges, and Future of United Nations Peacekeeping Contributions, Alex J. Bellamy and Paul D. Williams, Eds., Oxford University Press , 2013.

During the first decade of the twenty-first century, the rising demand for peacekeepers saw the United Nations (UN) operate at a historically unprecedented tempo, with increases in the number and size of missions as well as in the scope and complexity of their mandates. The need to deploy over 120,000 UN peacekeepers and the demands placed upon them in the field have threatened to outstrip the willingness and to some extent capacity of the UN's Member States. This situation raised the questions of why states contribute forces to UN missions and, conversely, what factors inhibit them from doing more? Providing Peacekeepers answers these questions.

After summarizing the challenges confronting the UN in its force generation efforts, Providing Peacekeepers develops a new framework for analyzing UN peacekeeping contributions in light of the evidence presented in sixteen case study chapters which examine the experiences of the United States, the United Kingdom, France, the People's Republic of China, the Russian Federation, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, Nigeria, Ghana, Nepal, Uruguay, Brazil, Turkey, South Africa, and Japan. The book concludes by offering recommendations for how the UN might develop new strategies for force generation so as to meet the foreseeable challenges of twenty-first century peacekeeping and improve the quantity and quality of its uniformed peacekeepers.

 

book cover: Handbook On The Theory And Practice Of Program Evaluation

Nicholas S. Vonortas, Professor of Economics and International Affairs

Handbook on the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation, Albert N. Link , Nicholas S. Vonortas, Eds., Edward Elgar Publ., 2013.

There has been a dramatic increase in expenditures on public goods over the past thirty years, particularly in the area of research and development. As governments explore the many opportunities for growth in this area, they — and the general public — are becoming increasingly concerned with the transparency, accountability and performance of public programs. This pioneering Handbook offers a collection of critical essays on the theory and practice of program evaluation, written by some of the most well-known experts in the field.

As this volume demonstrates, a wide variety of methodologies exists to evaluate particularly the objectives and outcomes of research and development programs. These include surveys, statistical and econometric estimations, patent analyses, bibliometrics, scientometrics, network analyses, case studies, and historical tracings. Contributors divide these and other methods and applications into four categories — economic, non-economic, hybrid and data-driven — in order to discuss the many factors that affect the utility of each technique and how that impacts the technological, economic and societal forecasts of the programs in question.

Scholars, practitioners and students with an interest in economics and innovation will all find this Handbook an invaluable resource.